Trending February 2024 # Add A Few Laughs To Your Day With Instafun # Suggested March 2024 # Top 2 Popular

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How many times have you been told that you need to lighten up and have a little fun? If you’re an uptight person, always stressed out or a workaholic, taking a break and having fun is probably something that you don’t do enough.

Everyone needs and deserves a little bit of fun in their lives. As the saying goes, “all work and no play makes (insert name here) a dull boy/girl.” This is why I wanted to write about Instafun, a new Mac app that reminds you to have some fun. Instafun gives you instant access to fun and interesting images and Internet memes. Instafun is simple, with a minimalistic design that needs a little work, but gets the job done.

Getting Started Usage and Interface

Instafun currently gives you access to the mobile versions of three popular sites: 9gag, CHEEZburger and LOLsnaps. Each site has it’s own tab and you must use the slider at the top to switch between them. One thing I noticed is that the icons for each site (at the top) are a bit blurry.

As you can see from the screenshot above, navigating in Instafun is easy. There are arrows in the top left corner so that you can easily go back and forth between pages. On the far right there are buttons for sharing, opening the current view in a browser and settings.

The sharing button allows you to send images to email, Messages/iMessage, Twitter or Facebook. In settings you can choose to: start Instafun automatically (at login), remind you to have fun, and play a sound with reminder your reminder. Instafun will remind you to have fun every 15 minutes; unfortunately there’s no way to customize this.

It’s nice to have an unobtrusive reminder to have fun. Every 15 minutes you’ll see the smiley face turn from black to blue. If you enable sound to go along with your reminder, you’ll hear a short laugh as well. Although I must admit that the laugh sound is borderline creepy – especially if you’re home alone and it’s quiet in the house and your volume is up loud.

9gag

If you’re using this app from work, it’s probably best to keep safe mode on. The filter does not totally remove unsafe images, instead it blocks them out and adds a “NSFW” tag next to them (see screenshot above).

LOLsnaps CHEEZburger

Finally we have the CHEEZburger Network, which is a favorite of mine. Although you don’t need an account, you’ll want to sign up so that you can like and dislike images, add to your favorites and share on Facebook.

I tried to find a way to sign up through the app, but failed to find a signup/login link. I have an account on the CHEEZburger Network, so I know that it is possible.

Final Thoughts

I’m sure that some may find this Mac app a bit cheesy, but I like the idea of having fun images to view right from my menu bar. Instafun has great intentions and I feel that it delivers nicely.

Charnita Fance

Charnita has been a Freelance Writer & Professional Blogger since 2008. As an early adopter she loves trying out new apps and services. As a Windows, Mac, Linux and iOS user, she has a great love for bleeding edge technology. You can connect with her on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, and LinkedIn.

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How To Add Interactive Animations To Your App With Motionlayout

What is MotionLayout?

Getting started: ConstaintLayout 2.0

Start by creating a new project. You can use any settings, but when prompted, opt to “Include Kotlin support.”

MotionLayout was introduced in ConstraintLayout 2.0 alpha1, so your project will need access to version 2.0 alpha1 or higher. Open your build.gradle file, and add the following:

Code

implementation 'com.android.support.constraint:constraint-layout:2.0.0-alpha2' How do I create a MotionLayout widget?

Every MotionLayout animation consists of:

A MotionLayout widget: Unlike other animation solutions such as TransitionManager, MotionLayout only supplies capabilities to its direct children, so you’ll typically use MotionLayout as the root of your layout resource file.

A MotionScene: You define MotionLayout animations in a separate XML file called a MotionScene. This means that your layout resource file only needs to contain details about your Views, and not any of the animation properties and effects that you want to apply to those Views.

Open your project’s activity_main.xml file, and create a MotionLayout widget, plus the button that we’ll be animating throughout this tutorial.

<android.support.constraint.motion.MotionLayout android:layout_width=”match_parent” android:layout_height=”match_parent” <Button android:id=”@+id/button” android:layout_width=”wrap_content” android:layout_height=”wrap_content” android:text=”To the right (and back)” app:layout_constraintLeft_toLeftOf=”parent” app:layout_constraintStart_toStartOf=”parent”

The MotionScene file needs to be stored inside an “res/xml” directory. If your project doesn’t already contain this directory, then:

Name this directory “xml.”

Open the “Resource type” dropdown, and select “xml.”

Next, you need to create the XML file where you’ll build your MotionScene:

Since we’re animating a button, I’m going to name this file “button_MotionScene.”

Open the “xml/button_motionscene” file, and then add the following MotionScene element:

<MotionScene <MotionScene <Constraint android:id=”@+id/button” app:layout_constraintTop_toTopOf=”parent” app:layout_constraintLeft_toLeftOf=”parent” android:layout_width=”wrap_content” android:layout_height=”wrap_content” <Constraint android:id=”@+id/button” app:layout_constraintRight_toRightOf=”parent” android:layout_width=”wrap_content” android:layout_height=”wrap_content” <MotionScene <Transition motion:constraintSetStart=”@+id/starting_set” motion:constraintSetEnd=”@+id/ending_set” <Constraint android:id=”@+id/button” motion:layout_constraintTop_toTopOf=”parent” motion:layout_constraintLeft_toLeftOf=”parent” android:layout_width=”wrap_content” <Constraint android:id=”@+id/button” motion:layout_constraintRight_toRightOf=”parent” android:layout_width=”wrap_content” <android.support.constraint.motion.MotionLayout android:layout_width=”match_parent” android:layout_height=”match_parent” android:id=”@+id/motionLayout_container” <Button android:id=”@+id/button” android:layout_width=”wrap_content” android:layout_height=”wrap_content” android:text=”Bottom right and back” app:layout_constraintLeft_toLeftOf=”parent” app:layout_constraintStart_toStartOf=”parent”

To start this animation, we need to call the transitionToEnd() method. I’m going to call transitionToEnd() when the button is tapped:

Code

import android.os.Bundle import android.support.v7.app.AppCompatActivity import android.view.View import kotlinx.android.synthetic.main.activity_main.* class MainActivity : AppCompatActivity() { override fun onCreate(savedInstanceState: Bundle?) { super.onCreate(savedInstanceState) setContentView(R.layout.activity_main) } fun start(v: View) { motionLayout_container.transitionToEnd() } }

Install this project on a physical Android smartphone, tablet, or Android Virtual Device (AVD) and give the button a tap. The button widget should respond by moving from one corner of the screen to the other.

At this point we have a problem: once the button has moved to the upper-right corner of the screen, the animation is over and we can’t repeat it unless we exit and relaunch the app. How do we get the button back to its starting position?

Monitoring an animation with transitionToStart()

The easiest way to return a widget to its starting ConstraintSet, is to monitor the animation’s progress and then call transitionToStart() once the animation is complete. You monitor an animation’s progress by attaching a TransitionListener object to the MotionLayout widget.

TransitionListener has two abstract methods:

onTransitionCompleted(): This method is called when the transition is complete. I’ll be using this method to notify MotionLayout that it should move the button back to its original position.

onTransitionChange(): This method is called every time the progress of an animation changes. This progress is represented by a floating-point number between zero and one, which I’ll be printing to Android Studio’s Logcat.

Here’s the complete code:

Code

import android.os.Bundle import android.support.constraint.motion.MotionLayout import android.support.v7.app.AppCompatActivity import android.util.Log import android.view.View import kotlinx.android.synthetic.main.activity_main.* class MainActivity : AppCompatActivity() { override fun onCreate(savedInstanceState: Bundle?) { super.onCreate(savedInstanceState) setContentView(R.layout.activity_main) motionLayout_container.setTransitionListener( object: MotionLayout.TransitionListener { override fun onTransitionChange(motionLayout: MotionLayout?, startId: Int, endId: Int, progress: Float) { Log.d("TAG", "Progress:" + progress) } override fun onTransitionCompleted(motionLayout: MotionLayout?, currentId: Int) { if(currentId == R.id.ending_set) { motionLayout_container.transitionToStart() } } } ) } fun start(v: View) { motionLayout_container.transitionToEnd() }

Currently, our button moves in a straight line from point A to point B. We can alter the shape of the animation path by defining some intermediate points. If you think of ConstraintSets as MotionLayout’s “resting states,” then keyframes are the points the widget must pass through en route to its next resting state.

MotionLayout supports various keyframes, but we’ll be focusing on:

KeyPosition: Modifies the path the widget takes during the animation.

KeyCycle: Adds an oscillation to your animation.

KeyAttribute: Applies a new attribute value at a specific point during the transition such as changing in color or size.

All keyframes must be placed inside a KeyFrameSet, which in turn must be placed inside a Transition element. Open the “button_motionscene.xml” file and add a KeyFrameSet:

Code

<Transition android:id="@+id/my_transition" app:constraintSetStart="@+id/starting_set" app:constraintSetEnd="@+id/ending_set"

Let’s start by using a KeyPosition keyframe to alter the path our button widget takes through the animation.

A KeyPosition must specify the following:

motion:target: The ID of the widget that’s affected by the keyframe, which in this instance is the button widget.

motion:framePosition: The point where the keyframe is applied during the transition, ranging from the animation’s starting point (0) to its ending point (100).

app:percentX and motion:percentY: Each keyframe’s position is expressed as a pair of X and Y coordinates, although the result of these coordinates will be affected by the project’s motion:keyPositionType.

motion:keyPositionType: This controls how Android calculates the animation path, and by extension the X and Y coordinates. The possible values are parentRelative (relative to the parent container), deltaRelative (the distance between the widget’s start and end position) and pathRelative (the linear path between the widget’s start and end states).

I’m using KeyPosition to transform the animation’s straight line into a curve:

Code

<Transition motion:constraintSetStart="@+id/starting_set" motion:constraintSetEnd="@+id/ending_set" <KeyPosition motion:target="@+id/button" motion:keyPositionType="parentRelative" motion:percentY="1"

You can apply multiple keyframes to the same animation as long as you don’t use multiple keyframes of the same type at the same time. Let’s look at how we can add an oscillation to our animation using KeyCycles.

Similar to KeyPosition, you need to specify the ID of the target widget (app:target) and the point where the keyframe should be applied (app:framePosition). However, KeyCycle also requires a few additional elements:

android:rotation: The rotation that should be applied to the widget as it moves along the animation path.

app:waveShape: The shape of the oscillation. You can choose from sin, square, triangle, sawtooth, reverseSawtooth, cos, and bounce.

app:wavePeriod: The number of wave cycles.

I’m adding a KeyCycle that gives the button a “sin” oscillation of 50 degrees:

Code

<Transition motion:constraintSetStart="@+id/starting_set" motion:constraintSetEnd="@+id/ending_set" <KeyPosition motion:target="@+id/button" motion:keyPositionType="parentRelative" motion:percentY="1" <KeyCycle motion:target="@+id/button" motion:framePosition="50" android:rotation="25" motion:waveShape="sin"

Scaling up with KeyAttribute

You can specify other widget attribute changes using KeyAttribute.

I’m using KeyAttribute and android:scale to change the size of the button, mid-animation:

<MotionScene <Transition motion:constraintSetStart="@+id/starting_set" motion:constraintSetEnd="@+id/ending_set" <KeyPosition motion:target="@+id/button" motion:keyPositionType="parentRelative" motion:percentY="1" <KeyCycle motion:target="@+id/button" motion:framePosition="50" android:rotation="25" motion:waveShape="sin" <KeyAttribute motion:target="@id/button" android:scaleX="2" android:scaleY="2" <Constraint android:id="@+id/button" motion:layout_constraintTop_toTopOf="parent" motion:layout_constraintLeft_toLeftOf="parent" android:layout_width="wrap_content" <Constraint android:id="@+id/button" motion:layout_constraintRight_toRightOf="parent" android:layout_width="wrap_content"

We’ve already seen how you can use KeyFrames to change a widget’s properties as it moves from one ConstraintSet to the other, but you can further customize your animation using custom attributes.

A CustomAttribute must include the name of the attribute (attributeName) and the value you’re using, which can be any of the following:

customColorValue

customColorDrawableValue

customIntegerValue

customFloatValue

customStringValue

customDimension

customBoolean

<MotionScene <Transition motion:constraintSetStart="@+id/starting_set" motion:constraintSetEnd="@+id/ending_set" <KeyPosition motion:target="@+id/button" motion:keyPositionType="parentRelative" motion:percentY="1" <KeyCycle motion:target="@+id/button" motion:framePosition="50" android:rotation="25" motion:waveShape="sin" <Constraint android:id="@+id/button" motion:layout_constraintTop_toTopOf="parent" motion:layout_constraintLeft_toLeftOf="parent" android:layout_width="wrap_content" <CustomAttribute motion:attributeName="backgroundColor" <Constraint android:id="@+id/button" motion:layout_constraintRight_toRightOf="parent" android:layout_width="wrap_content" <CustomAttribute motion:attributeName="backgroundColor"

Throughout this tutorial, we’ve built a complex animation consisting of multiple attribute changes and effects. However, once you tap the button the animation cycles through all of these different stages without any further input from you — wouldn’t it be nice to have more control over the animation?

In this final section we’re going to make the animation interactive, so you can drag the button back and forth along the animation path and through all of the different states, while MotionLayout tracks the velocity of your finger and matches it to the velocity of the animation.

To create this kind of interactive, draggable animation, we need to add an onSwipe element to the Transition block and specify the following:

motion:touchAnchorId: The ID of the widget that you want to track.

motion:touchAnchorSide: The side of the widget that should react to onSwipe events. The possible values are right, left, top, and bottom.

motion:dragDirection: The direction of the motion that you want to track. Choose from dragRight, dragLeft, dragUp, or dragDown.

Here’s the updated code:

<OnSwipe motion:touchAnchorId="@+id/button" motion:touchAnchorSide="right"

You can download this complete project from GitHub.

Wrapping up

How To Add A Recycling Bin To Your Android Device

The recycling bin in our computers is something we are always going to find. It acts as a type of backup where we will always have access to the files we erased, whether it was by accident or not. There is no doubt that it’s very useful on our computers, but what about our Android devices? Unfortunately, smartphones don’t automatically come with a recycling bin, and if you delete something, you won’t have much luck getting it back. Read on to find out how you can add one to your Android device.

There are also some apps that could help you recover lost files on an Android  device, but there are very few that work the way they should. Until now, if you erased a song or a file, it was lost, but with Dumpster, you have a second chance to get back what you accidentally deleted. With this app you can only recover accidentally deleted files after you installed it in your Android device.

How to Use Dumpster

This app is very simple and user-friendly. If you don’t get along very well with technology or you’re new to the Android world, you are going to love this app. Dumpster will save all the files you delete, and they will be there as long as you want them to be.

Before you start deleting, you need to go to the hamburger symbol on the upper left-hand corner and tap on settings.

Once there, go to “Protect Settings” to allow you to toggle on the types of files you want Dumpster to save. You can choose from Images, Video, Audio, Documents, Other files, Apps and Protect Apps Updates.

In Settings you can also set up Dumpster so it will automatically erase the files the app has saved every week, every month, or every three months.

Specify the Kind of File Dumpster Should Save

Do you want to erase your images but keep your audio files a little longer? Dumpster offers you the oprion to only delete a particular type of file or erase everything all together. Being able to specify what you want to remove is a great feature since you can erase what you are sure you don’t need anymore and hold on to everything else.

Before trusting the app with your files, do a little testing first to make sure it saves what you erase. When I first downloaded the app and tested to see if it saved what I eliminated, it only started saving from the third file. After that it worked just fine.

Conclusion

Judy Sanhz

Judy Sanhz is a tech addict that always needs to have a device in her hands. She loves reading about Android, Softwares, Web Apps and anything tech chúng tôi hopes to take over the world one day by simply using her Android smartphone!

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Your Guide To Memorial Day Weekend In Boston

Your Guide to Memorial Day Weekend in Boston Free museum days, Boston Calling Music Festival, baseball, and more

Memorial Day weekend is an opportunity to commemorate the sacrifices made by veterans and the men and women serving in the armed services. It’s also a great time to kick off the unofficial start of summer with family and friends. For those staying local, Boston offers a wealth of events honoring those who have died serving their country, as well as a three-day music festival, free admission to some of the city’s best art museums, and a Red Sox home game. We’ve compiled a list of some of the best events below.

Commemorating America’s Veterans

Stop by the annual Flag Garden at Boston Common this weekend to honor the 37,000-plus Massachusetts veterans who died while serving their country. The base of the Soldiers and Sailors Monument is transformed into a sea of red, white, and blue each Memorial Day, thanks to volunteers from the Massachusetts Military Heroes Fund, who plant a flag for each veteran who lost their life, dating back to the Revolutionary War.

The Flag Garden, atop Flagstaff Hill on the Boston Common, is on display through Memorial Day, Monday, May 27. Take any MBTA Green Line trolley to Arlington, Boylston, or Park Street.

In keeping with tradition, the USS Constitution Museum, devoted to the War of 1812, commemorates America’s soldiers—past and present—with special programming. On Memorial Day, museum guests can take part in a Navy tradition: in the event of a sailor’s death, eight bells are rung in their memory. This year, the museum invites visitors to honor the deaths of the 250-plus men who died on the USS Constitution during the War of 1812, by writing their names on a paper bell to be displayed in the museum. While you’re at the museum, be sure to visit the USS Constitution—the oldest commissioned warship in the world—just across the pier. The warship recently underwent a spectacular two-year, $15 million restoration. Note: the museum and ship operate separately and have different hours.

The USS Constitution Museum, in the Charlestown Navy Yard, Charlestown, is open from 9 am to 6 pm daily; phone: 617-426-1812. Suggested donation is $5 to $10 for adults, $3 to $5 for children, and $20 to $25 for families. Admission is free for all active duty, retired, and reserve military personnel. Honoring Our Heroes events and activities are Saturday, May 26, through Monday, May 28.

The USS Constitution is inside Boston National Historical Park, next to the USS Constitution Museum, and is open Tuesday to Sunday, 10 am to 6 pm, closed most Mondays, but is open Memorial Day. Admission to the ship is free for all visitors, first come, first served. Visitors 18 and over must provide a valid state or federal-issued ID or passport. Take an MBTA Green Line trolley to North Station and walk over the Charlestown Bridge, following signs for the Freedom Trail.

Cambridge’s annual Memorial Day Parade and Observance, organized by the Cambridge Veterans’ Organization and Cambridge Veterans’ Services, is Monday, May 27. A cannon salute marks the beginning of the parade on the Cambridge Common at 9:30 am. Veterans, elected officials, bands, youth organizations, and police and fire personnel march through Harvard Square, up Mount Auburn Street to Coolidge Avenue, ending at the Cambridge Cemetery. At 11 am, visitors will gather for a Memorial Day Observance, which will include musical performances and a rifle salute. Afterward, the Women’s Auxiliary of the Veterans of Foreign Wars will hold a brief memorial ceremony at the nearby John W. Weeks Bridge in honor of the Cambridge servicemen and women lost at sea.

The Cambridge Memorial Day Parade and Observance is Monday, May 27, at 9:30 am, at the Cambridge Common, and is expected to arrive at the Cambridge Cemetery, 76 Coolidge Ave., at 11 am. Take an MBTA Red Line train to Harvard Square.

Enjoy a free musical tribute to America’s fallen heroes at this Memorial Day concert which will include performances by the Metropolitan Wind Symphony, N’Harmony, and the Somerville High School chorus, at Sylvester Baxter State Riverfront Park at Assembly Row starting at 7:30 pm, followed by a dazzling fireworks display.

Memorial on the Mystic concert and fireworks display is Monday, May 27, at Sylvester Baxter State Riverfront Park, Assembly Row and Great River Road, Somerville. Take an MBTA Orange Line trolley to Assembly Square. Lawn chairs and blankets are recommended.

Other Memorial Day Weekend Events

As summer returns, so does Boston Calling, the popular three-day music festival that kicks off this year on Friday, May 24, and runs through Sunday, May 26, at the Harvard University Athletic Complex in Allston. Twenty One Pilots headlines Friday’s lineup, followed by Tame Impala on Saturday, and Travis Scott on Sunday. Other notable performers among the 50+ acts appearing include Greta Van Fleet, Hozier, Logic, and the artist behind the country rap hit “Old Town Road,” Lil Nas X (who will be accompanied by a special guest). Find the complete lineup here.

Be sure to check out the separate lineup of comedy acts and other performances, like Lamont Price, Jenny Slate, and Boston Ballet, performing at the Boston Calling Arena. Seating is on a first-come, first-served basis. And plan to come hungry. There will be numerous food vendors on hand throughout the weekend, including Roxy’s Grilled Cheese, Bon Me, Sweet Cheeks Q, and Tasty Burger.

The Boston Calling Music Festival is at the Harvard University Athletic Complex, 65 North Harvard St., Allston, Friday, May 24, through Sunday, May 26. Purchase three-day passes, weekend passes, and single-day tickets here. Gates open Friday at 2:30 pm and music ends at 11 pm. On Saturday and Sunday, gates open at noon and the final performance ends at 11 pm. Large bags and backpacks are prohibited. Find directions here.

To commemorate Memorial Day, the Museum of Fine Arts offers free admission on Monday with live music performances, tours, and interactive activities, many inspired by the MFA’s special current exhibit Frida Kahlo and Arte Popular, which explores Kahlo’s fascination with Mexican folk art (arte popular) and how her collection of decorated ceramics, embroidered textiles, and devotional retablo paintings inspired and shaped her work. Guests can take part in art-making activities, bilingual storytelling, and more. Guided tours offer overviews of some of the museum’s most popular collections, including art of the Americas, art of the ancient world, and the contemporary collection. At 1:30 and 3:30 pm, classical guitarist Zaira Meneses will take the stage with her band Son Jarocho in the Remis Auditorium for a musical celebration of Mexican culture. Another performance, Los Colores de Frida, combines storytelling, music, visual arts, and puppets presented in collaboration with Inquilinos Boricuas en Acción.

This year’s open house marks the start of the MFA’s expansion of accessibility to military families, including year-round free admission and discounted memberships.

The Museum of Fine Arts Memorial Day Open House is Monday, May 27, from 10 am to 5 pm, 465 Huntington Ave. Admission is free and performance tickets are first come, first served and available 30 minutes before each show at the venue. Find directions here.

Another one of Boston’s premier museums, the Institute of Contemporary Art, is also offering free admission on Memorial Day. Guests can view the ICA’s permanent collection as well as several temporary exhibits featuring work by Karachi artist Huma Bhabha, Icelandic artist Ragnar Kjartansson, and American artist Nina Chanel Abney. In addition, the ICA is hosting a Sci-Fi Shorts film screening, curated by the Boston Underground Film Festival, from 11 am to 4 pm. Visitors can take part in art-making activities, including a chance to create your own multimedia collage, as well.

The Institute of Contemporary Art/Boston’s Memorial Day Open House is Monday, May 27, from 10 am to 5 pm, 100 Northern Ave. Find directions here.

Back by popular demand, the Patios returns to City Hall Plaza after a successful inaugural season last summer. Featuring nine custom patio areas, a main pavilion structure, Wachusett Brew Yard, a pop-up snack shop, and mini-golf stations, the Patios is a terrific place to enjoy a late spring day with friends and family. On Sunday, four electric grills will be available for free on a first-come, first-served basis for those who want to do their own cooking. There will also be a variety of food options with rotating food trucks Monday through Saturday from 5 to 8 pm and a midday food truck program running daily from 11 am to 3 pm. Weekly pop-ups will include “Wag Wednesdays,” which brings puppies from Dedham-based dog rescue Shultz’s Guest House to the plaza from noon to 2 pm weekly.

The Patios at One City Hall Plaza are open every day through August. Take an MBTA Green or Blue Line train to Government Center, or an Orange Line train to State St. or Haymarket.

Sports

Soccer fans, here’s a chance to cheer on the local team. Head over to Gillette Stadium and watch Boston’s Major League Soccer team, the New England Revolution, take on DC United at 7:30 pm on Saturday. Make a day of it by exploring Patriot Place (adjacent to the stadium), which, in addition to housing the New England Patriots Hall of Fame, also includes 1.3 million square feet of restaurants, stores, and other attractions.

The New England Revolution host DC United at Gillette Stadium, 1 Patriot Place, Foxborough, at 7:30 pm on Saturday, May 25. Purchase tickets online. Take any MBTA Green Line train to Copley Station, and walk five minutes on Dartmouth Street to Back Bay Station. Round-trip tickets to Gillette Stadium are $20 and can be purchased online or from the ticket offices at South Station, North Station, or Back Bay. Take the Franklin Line commuter rail train from Back Bay station to Norfolk station. Finally, take the Tri-Town Connector bus from Norfolk station to Patriot Place.

With a 25-23 record so far this season, the Red Sox appear to be in the middle of a World Series hangover. That said, a trip to Fenway Park is always a treat. Cheer the team on as they host the Cleveland Indians on Monday in the first of three consecutive home games.

The Boston Red Sox host the Cleveland Indians at Fenway Park, 4 Yawkey Way, Boston, on Monday, May 27, at 4:05 pm, Tuesday, May 28, at 7:10 pm, and Wednesday, May 29, at 7:10 pm. Purchase tickets online.

Abigail Freeman (COM’19) can be reached at [email protected].

How To Add Notes With Homepod

Do you utilize the Notes app on your iPhone or iPad for note-taking, making to-do lists, or for writing down any other important information? If you own a HomePod, you’ll be pleased to know that you can also add notes to the Notes app, directly from the HomePod and without typing them out. That’s right, you can add notes with just your voice.

Manually taking down notes may be something you’re used to, but thanks to Siri on the HomePod, you can use voice commands to add notes stored on your Apple devices. Just like on the iPhone, iPad, and Mac, you can use Siri to get a lot of things done, including taking notes. However, a lot of Apple users choose to manually go through the Notes app instead, and don’t rely on Siri for note taking. Having said that, when you’re using a smart speaker like HomePod, you’re kind of forced to use Siri more often.

All you need is some time to get a hang of things. So, if you’re interested in learning the smarter way to add notes, read on to learn more.

How to Add Notes with HomePod

It doesn’t matter which HomePod model you own or which firmware your HomePod is running, since we’ll be using Siri to add notes and it’s a feature that has been available since launch. Here’s what you need to do:

Start off by using the voice command “Hey Siri, add a note called ‘To-do List’”. Siri will confirm that the note has been created.

Once the note is created, you can use the voice command “Hey Siri, edit the note ‘To-do list’.”

Siri will now respond “What would you like to add?”. At this point, you just need to simply dictate what you want Siri to add to your note and you’re done.

As you can see, it’s that easy to add notes to your iPhone using your HomePod. And yes, these notes will sync to other apple devices too that are using the same Apple ID, whether that’s another iPhone, Mac, iPad, or otherwise.

Unfortunately, you cannot use HomePod to delete notes on your iPhone. If you try using Siri to delete a note, you will just get the response “Sorry, I can’t help you delete notes. You can do that in the app.” As of now, it looks like you’re limited to adding and editing notes, but perhaps that will change in the future.

It’s worth pointing out that Siri on the HomePod can also access the existing notes that are stored on your iPhone, iPad, and Mac. You can make changes to all these notes using Siri and Dictation. Once you get used to it, you’ll realize that it’s way easier and a lot quicker to take notes with your HomePod.

This is just one of the many cool things that you can do with your HomePod. For example, you can use your HomePod to locate your lost iPhone, iPad, AirPods, or Mac as Siri can access Find My details. Also, if you use iTunes on a Windows PC, you can feed audio straight to your HomePod speakers within a matter of seconds.

Related

List A Few Statistical Methods Available For A Numpy Array

In this article, we will show you a list of a few statistical methods of NumPy library in python.

Statistics is dealing with collecting and analyzing data. It describes methods for collecting samples, describing data, and concluding data. NumPy is the core package for scientific calculations, hence NumPy statistical Functions go hand in hand.

Numpy has a number of statistical functions that can be used to do statistical data analysis. Let us discuss a few of them here.

numpy.amin() and numpy.amax()

These functions return the minimum and the maximum from the elements in the given array along the specified axis.

Example

inputArray

=

np

.

array

(

[

[

2

,

6

,

3

]

,

[

1

,

5

,

4

]

,

[

8

,

12

,

9

]

]

)

print

(

‘Input Array is:’

)

print

(

inputArray

)

print

(

)

print

(

“Minimum element in an array:”

,

np

.

amin

(

inputArray

)

)

print

(

)

print

(

“Maximum element in an array:”

,

np

.

amax

(

inputArray

)

)

print

(

)

print

(

‘Minimum element in an array among axis 0(rows):’

)

print

(

np

.

amin

(

inputArray

,

0

)

)

print

(

‘Minimum element in an array among axis 1(columns):’

)

print

(

np

.

amin

(

inputArray

,

1

)

)

print

(

)

print

(

‘Maximum element in an array among axis 0(rows):’

)

print

(

np

.

amax

(

inputArray

,

0

)

)

print

(

)

print

(

‘Maximum element in an array among axis 1(columns):’

)

print

(

np

.

amax

(

inputArray

,

axis

=

1

)

)

print

(

)

Output

On executing, the above program will generate the following output −

Input Array is: [[ 2 6 3] [ 1 5 4] [ 8 12 9]] Minimum element in an array: 1 Maximum element in an array: 12 Minimum element in an array among axis 0(rows): [1 5 3] Minimum element in an array among axis 1(columns): [2 1 8] Maximum element in an array among axis 0(rows): [ 8 12 9] Maximum element in an array among axis 1(columns): [ 6 5 12] numpy.ptp() Example

The numpy.ptp() function returns the range (maximum-minimum) of values along an axis. The ptp() is an abbreviation for peak-to-peak.

inputArray

=

np

.

array

(

[

[

2

,

6

,

3

]

,

[

1

,

5

,

4

]

,

[

8

,

12

,

9

]

]

)

print

(

‘Input Array is:’

)

print

(

inputArray

)

print

(

)

print

(

‘The peak to peak(ptp) values of an array’

)

print

(

np

.

ptp

(

inputArray

)

)

print

(

)

print

(

‘Range (maximum-minimum) of values along axis 1(columns):’

)

print

(

np

.

ptp

(

inputArray

,

axis

=

1

)

)

print

(

)

print

(

‘Range (maximum-minimum) of values along axis 0(rows):’

)

print

(

np

.

ptp

(

inputArray

,

axis

=

0

)

)

Output

On executing, the above program will generate the following output −

Input Array is: [[ 2 6 3] [ 1 5 4] [ 8 12 9]] The peak to peak(ptp) values of an array 11 Range (maximum-minimum) of values along axis 1(columns): [4 4 4] Range (maximum-minimum) of values along axis 0(rows): [7 7 6] numpy.percentile()

Percentile (or a centile) is a measure used in statistics indicating the value below which a given percentage of observations in a group of observations fall.

It computes the nth percentile of data along the given axis.

Syntax numpy.percentile(a, q, axis) Parameters

a Input array

q The percentile to compute must be between 0-100

axis The axis along which the percentile is to be calculated

Example

inputArray

=

np

.

array

(

[

[

20

,

45

,

70

]

,

[

30

,

25

,

50

]

,

[

10

,

80

,

90

]

]

)

print

(

‘Input Array is:’

)

print

(

inputArray

)

print

(

)

print

(

‘Applying percentile() function to print 10th percentile:’

)

print

(

np

.

percentile

(

inputArray

,

10

)

)

print

(

)

print

(

’10th percentile of array along the axis 1(columns):’

)

print

(

np

.

percentile

(

inputArray

,

10

,

axis

=

1

)

)

print

(

)

print

(

’10th percentile of array along the axis 0(rows):’

)

print

(

np

.

percentile

(

inputArray

,

10

,

axis

=

0

)

)

Output

On executing, the above program will generate the following output −

Input Array is: [[20 45 70] [30 25 50] [10 80 90]] Applying percentile() function to print 10th percentile: 18.0 10th percentile of array along the axis 1(columns): [25. 26. 24.] 10th percentile of array along the axis 0(rows): [12. 29. 54.] numpy.median()

Median is defined as the value separating the higher half of a data sample from the lower half.

The numpy.median() function calculates the median of the multi-dimensional or one-dimensional arrays.

Example

inputArray

=

np

.

array

(

[

[

20

,

45

,

70

]

,

[

30

,

25

,

50

]

,

[

10

,

80

,

90

]

]

)

print

(

‘Input Array is:’

)

print

(

inputArray

)

print

(

)

print

(

‘Median of an array:’

)

print

(

np

.

median

(

inputArray

)

)

print

(

)

print

(

‘Median of array along the axis 0(rows):’

)

print

(

np

.

median

(

inputArray

,

axis

=

0

)

)

print

(

)

print

(

‘Median of array along the axis 1(columns):’

)

print

(

np

.

median

(

inputArray

,

axis

=

1

)

)

Output

On executing, the above program will generate the following output −

Input Array is: [[20 45 70] [30 25 50] [10 80 90]] Median of an array: 45.0 Median of array along the axis 0(rows): [20. 45. 70.] Median of array along the axis 1(columns): [45. 30. 80.] numpy.mean()

Arithmetic mean is the sum of elements along an axis divided by the number of elements.

The numpy.mean() function returns the arithmetic mean of elements in the array. If the axis is mentioned, it is calculated along it.

Example

inputArray

=

np

.

array

(

[

[

20

,

45

,

70

]

,

[

30

,

25

,

50

]

,

[

10

,

80

,

90

]

]

)

print

(

‘Input Array is:’

)

print

(

inputArray

)

print

(

)

print

(

‘Mean of an array:’

)

print

(

np

.

mean

(

inputArray

)

)

print

(

)

print

(

‘Mean of an array along the axis 0(rows):’

)

print

(

np

.

mean

(

inputArray

,

axis

=

0

)

)

print

(

)

print

(

‘Mean of an array along the axis 1(columns):’

)

print

(

np

.

mean

(

inputArray

,

axis

=

1

)

)

Output

On executing, the above program will generate the following output −

Input Array is: [[20 45 70] [30 25 50] [10 80 90]] Mean of an array: 46.666666666666664 Mean of an array along the axis 0(rows): [20. 50. 70.] Mean of an array along the axis 1(columns): [45. 35. 60.] numpy.average()

The numpy.average() function computes the weighted average along the axis of multidimensional arrays whose weights are specified in another array.

The function can have an axis parameter. If the axis is not specified, the array is flattened.

Example

inputArray

=

np

.

array

(

[

1

,

2

,

3

,

4

]

)

print

(

‘Input Array is:’

)

print

(

inputArray

)

print

(

)

print

(

‘Average of all elements in an array:’

)

print

(

np

.

average

(

inputArray

)

)

print

(

)

Output

On executing, the above program will generate the following output −

Input Array is: [1 2 3 4] Average of all elements in an array: 2.5 Standard Deviation & Variance Standard deviation

Standard deviation is the square root of the average of squared deviations from mean. The formula for standard deviation is as follows −

std = sqrt(mean(abs(x - x.mean())**2))

If the array is [1, 2, 3, 4], then its mean is 2.5. Hence the squared deviations are [2.25, 0.25, 0.25, 2.25] and the square root of its mean divided by 4, i.e., sqrt (5/4) is 1.1180339887498949.

Variance

Variance is the average of squared deviations, i.e., mean(abs(x – x.mean())**2). In other words, the standard deviation is the square root of variance.

Example

inputArray

=

[

1

,

2

,

3

,

4

]

print

(

“Input Array =”

,

inputArray

)

print

(

“Standard deviation of array = “

,

np

.

std

(

inputArray

)

)

print

(

“Variance of array = “

,

np

.

var

(

inputArray

)

)

Output

On executing, the above program will generate the following output −

Input Array = [1, 2, 3, 4] Standard deviation of array = 1.118033988749895 Variance of array = 1.25 Conclusion

By using examples, we studied some of the few statistical methods for a Numpy array in this article.

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