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Windows shows the time and date both in the taskbar and flyout calendar panel in a very traditional way: i.e. the date is represented by two digits and backward slash (/) as a separator. The time is represented in either 24-hour or 12-hour format while using a colon (:) as the separator between hours, minutes, and seconds.

Maybe you want to use dashes or dots as the separator, show day of the week in the taskbar, use a custom symbol for AM and PM, etc. Here is how you can fully customize the time and date format in Windows 10.

Customize Time Format

To fully customize the time and date formats you have to dig deep within the Control Panel. But as a reward, you are provided with plenty of options to customize the time and date formats. If needed, you can even customize the number and currency formats, too.

The below method works for Windows 7 and 8.

4. In the customize format window go to the Time tab. Here you can customize how the short time (appears on the taskbar) and long time (appears in the flyout calendar panel) looks. All you have to do is enter the appropriate notation in the “Short Time” and “Long Time” fields under the “Time Formats” section.

Fortunately, you can see what notations to use and what they actually mean under the “What the notations mean” section. If you want to, you can also customize the separator between hours, minutes, and seconds to whatever you want.

Note: the Short Time cannot display seconds on the taskbar. Seconds are only visible in the flyout calendar panel.

5. Similarly, you can enter your own symbols for both AM and PM.

Customize Date Format

1. To customize the date format, go to the Date tab. Unlike the Time tab, the Date tab gives you quite a few notations to play around with.

2. Just like with the Time, type the notations in the Short Date and Long Date fields under the “Date Formats” section to customize how the date appears in the taskbar and in the calendar panel. For instance, I’ve used the date format “ddd, dd/MM/yyyy” to display the date as “Wed, 22/08/2024” in the taskbar.

You can see what notations to use and what they actually mean in the same section. Additionally, though Windows doesn’t explicitly tell you, you can display the full name of the month using the “MMMM” notation and short name of the week (eg: Fri) using the “MMM” notation.

Play with different notations, shuffle them, and use different separators and symbols to get most out of customizing the date and time.

Comment below sharing your thoughts and experiences regarding using the above method to customize the date and time formats in Windows.

Vamsi Krishna

Vamsi is a tech and WordPress geek who enjoys writing how-to guides and messing with his computer and software in general. When not writing for MTE, he writes for he shares tips, tricks, and lifehacks on his own blog Stugon.

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You're reading How To Fully Customize The Time And Date Format In Windows 10

How To Format Hard Drive Using Settings On Windows 10

On Windows 10, it’s recommended to format a hard drive to erase its current data and make sure to set up a supported file system that the operating system can understand to read and write data. Also, using the “Format” feature can help to delete all your personal data when you’re planning to get rid of the drive, so someone else doesn’t have easy access to your files.

In the past, you needed to use the Disk Management tool, Command Prompt, or PowerShell to format hard drive, but since build 20237, Windows 10 has a new experience built into the Storage settings to manage drives and partitions more easily.

In this guide, you’ll learn the steps to format a hard drive (internal or external) using the “Manage Disks and Volumes” settings available on Windows 10.

Format hard drive on Windows 10

To format a hard drive using the Manage Disks and Volumes settings, use these steps:

Important: The format process will delete everything on the drive. As a result, it’s recommended to backup any important data before proceeding.

Select the hard drive with the partition you want to format.

Select the partition.

In the “Label” field specify a name that you want to appear for the hard drive in File Explorer.

Use the “File System” drop-down menu and select the NTFS option.

Quick tip: If you’re formatting a flash drive that you’ll be using in different operating systems, you may want to consider using the exFAT file system.

Use the default select for Allocation Unit Size.

(Optional) Clear the Perform a quick format option to perform a full format. However, depending on the size of the hard drive, it could take a long time to complete. Usually, you may want to use this option if you’re decommissioning the storage device.

(Optional) Check the Enable file and folder compression if you want to save space as you store files. Using this option may slightly affect performance of the drive, since a compression and decompression process will occur as you use the storage.

Once you complete the steps, the partition of the hard drive will be formatted. You won’t see any visuals showing the formatting progress, but the “Format” button will be grayed out until the process completes.

Format hard drive without partition on Windows 10

If the storage device doesn’t have a partition, you’ll need to create a new partition and then format the drive.

To create and format an external or internal hard drive, use these steps:

Open Settings.

Select the hard drive you want to format.

Select the Unallocated space.

In the “Label” field specify a name that you want to appear for the hard drive.

Use the Drive Letter drop-down menu to assign a letter for the drive.

Use the “File System” drop-down menu and select the NTFS option.

(Optional) In the “Size” field specify the size of the partition in megabytes. If you’re planning to have one partition to store data, you don’t need to modify this option.

(Optional) In the “Folder Path to Mount in” field specify the path to a folder where you want to mount the drive. (This is an uncommon option for regular users.)

Use the default select for Allocation Unit Size.

(Optional) Clear the Perform a quick format option to perform a full format, but depending on the size of the hard drive, it could take a long time to complete.

(Optional) Check the Enable file and folder compression if you want to save space as you store files. Using this option may slightly affect performance of the drive, since a compression and decompression process will occur as you use the storage.

After you complete the steps, the new partition will be created and formatted with the file system you specified. Once the process is complete, you can start storing files using File Explorer.

The process may take some time to complete. You won’t see any progress visuals, but you’ll receive a notifications when the format is complete, and the drive will appear in File Explorer.

If you don’t see the Manage Disks and Volumes settings, it’s likely because you’re not running the version of Windows 10 that includes this feature. At the time of this writing, the feature is available with build 20237 and higher releases.

How To Compare Only Date Part Without Comparing Time In Javascript?

While developing the applications, sometimes it needs to compare the only date. For example, you are developing some apps in which users must adhere to the deadline and pay for the subscription. If the user pays at any time on or before the end date of the subscription, the user will be able to use the subscription continues. Otherwise, you need to stop the subscription.

In this tutorial, we will learn to compare only the date part without comparing the time in JavaScript.

In the above cases, we need to compare the two dates without focusing on the time.

Approach 1: Using the setHours() Method

The simple logic to compare the only date parts is that remove the time from both date objects or set the time to 0. Here, we will create new dates and set their time to 0 so that when we make a comparison between the dates, it will compare the date part only as the time of both dates will be the same.

Syntax

Users can follow the below syntax to create new date objects and set the time to 0 for them.

let date1 = new Date(); date1.setHours(0, 0, 0, 0); let date2 = new Date( Date ); date2.setHours(0, 0, 0, 0);

We can use the following syntax to compare the two dates.

} else if ( date1 < dae2 ) { } else { } Parameters

Date − The date objects take the date as a parameter for that date, we want to initialize the new object of the Date() class.

The setHours() method takes 4 parameters, which are hours, minutes, seconds, and milliseconds respectively. We will set all to 0 on both dates.

Example

In the example below, we have created two new dates using the Date() class. After that, we have set hours 0 for both dates. We have created the function to compare the dates, which prints different outputs according to the date comparison. We have taken different dates to compare and observe the results in the example below.

let

output

=

document

.

getElementById

(

“output”

)

;

function

compareDates

(

date1

,

date2

)

{

if

(

date1

<

date2

)

{

}

else

{

}

}

let

date1

=

new

Date

(

)

;

date1

.

setHours

(

0

,

0

,

0

,

0

)

;

let

date2

=

new

Date

(

2002

,

06

,

21

)

;

date2

.

setHours

(

0

,

0

,

0

,

0

)

;

compareDates

(

date1

,

date2

)

;

date2

=

new

Date

(

)

;

date2

.

setHours

(

0

,

0

,

0

,

0

)

;

compareDates

(

date1

,

date2

)

;

We have set hours to 0 to compare the only date parts in JavaScript. However, users can extract the year, month, and date from the date object and compare them separately.

Approach 2: Using the toDateString() Method

The toDateString() method can be used to return the only date part of a JavaScript date. It returns the date part as a string. We can’t compare the string as date so we need to convert this string back to date. Now it sets the date with the time part to zero.

Syntax

We can apply the syntax to convert a date to date string and then convert back to date.

let date1 = new Date().toDateString(); date1 = new Date(date1) Example

In the example below, we create two dates and then convert them to strings using toDateString(). Then again convert these strings back to date. Now we compare these dates.

let

output

=

document

.

getElementById

(

“output”

)

;

function

compareDates

(

date1

,

date2

)

{

if

(

date1

<

date2

)

{

}

else

{

}

}

let

date1

=

new

Date

(

)

.

toDateString

(

)

;

date1

=

new

Date

(

date1

)

let

date2

=

new

Date

(

2002

,

06

,

21

)

.

toDateString

(

)

;

date2

=

new

Date

(

date2

)

compareDates

(

date1

,

date2

)

;

date2

=

new

Date

(

)

.

toDateString

(

)

;

date2

=

new

Date

(

date2

)

compareDates

(

date1

,

date2

)

;

How To Customize The Finder Sidebar In Macos

This tutorial will walk you through various customization tips and tweaks to personalize the Finder sidebar on a Mac computer.

Table of Contents

Resize the Mac Finder Sidebar

The Finder sidebar shows up on the left side of every window you open, but you may not like its default size. Thankfully, you can resize it however you want.

Hide and Show the Finder Sidebar

You may run into instances where you want to maximize the amount of available space on a Finder window. Hiding the sidebar is one way that can help you with that.

Hide/Unhide Items in a Section of the Finder Sidebar

If you use iCloud Drive, you’ll also find shortcuts to iCloud Drive, your Shared folder, and other folders you choose to sync to iCloud under a section labeled iCloud.

An additional section—labeled Locations—lists external hard drives, connected iOS devices (iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch), third-party cloud-storage services, etc. You also have access to your file and folder tags at the bottom of the sidebar.

All of these items can make the sidebar appear too long. You may wish to hide categories that you don’t use often.

To do that, just select the Arrow icon next to a category. Select it again whenever you want to reveal its contents.

Manage Sidebar Items in Mac Finder

If the sidebar appears too cluttered or you find an item missing, you can manage what appears inside it via the Finder Preferences.

Under the

Sidebar

tab, you can select or deselect the items you want to appear under the following sections of the sidebar—e.g.,

Favorites

,

iCloud

,

Locations

, and

Tags

.

For example, if you want to see the Home folder of your Mac account, check the box next to your username.

Add Custom Folders to the Finder Sidebar

You can add any folder on your Mac to the Finder sidebar. All you need to do is drag it into the Favorites section and release it when you see a line between two existing items.

After adding a custom location to the sidebar, you can enter it immediately by selecting it. You can also move files and folders into it via drag and drop.

Add or Remove Files and Apps

Folders aside, you can also add files and apps to the Finder sidebar. Again, drag the item you want to add, but press and hold the Command key. Then, release when you see a line between two existing items.

Change Default Finder Sidebar Folder

By default, whenever you open a new Finder window, it automatically opens the Recents folder on the sidebar. You can change that to a different location—e.g.Documents—or a custom folder. To do that:

Open the pull-down menu under

New Finder windows show

.

Pick the sidebar location you want Finder to open by default. Choose

Other

if you want to pick a custom folder on your Mac.

Add Saved Searches to macOS Finder

Smart Folders in macOS are basically saved searches that let you filter files and folders based on various pre-set criteria. Any Smart Folder you create gets automatically added to the Favorites section of the Finder sidebar. To create one:

Select the

Plus

icon on the top right of the window to set up your filtering criteria—name, file type, size, etc.

Select

Save

, add a file for the Smart Folder, and select

Save

again.

Learn more about setting up and using Smart Folders on Mac.

Rearrange or Remove Items From the Sidebar

Set Up the Finder Sidebar the Way You Want

Customizing the Finder sidebar is one of the first steps to getting the most out of your Mac’s file management system. Check out 20 other ways to ramp up your Finder experience next.

10 Windows 11 Tips And Tricks We Use To Customize Our Pcs

But to integrate a tip, you have to try it out. So that’s what we’d like you to do: Give each of these tips a quick whirl, see if they work for you, and if they do, great! We want to take what helps us and use it to help you.

The list below includes both tips for older features as well as tips for new ones. Either way, enjoy!

Optimize your startup apps

Everyone hits the gym to start off the year. So why not use the time to trim some of the holiday bloat from your PC? There are potentially dozens of apps that can quietly load during your PC’s startup, slowing the time during which your PC boots and gobbling up memory for when it’s completed.

You’d be surprised at how many apps your PC can load at startup. Choose carefully to minimize the performance impact.

Mark Hachman / IDG

Set up your PC for multiple displays

Hopefully you use more than one display with your desktop and/or laptop, and you can buy great monitors on sale right now. They’re hugely productive, and if you’re worried about desk space, go vertical instead.

With Windows 11, you’ll want to do two things: “Arrange” your displays within Windows, and make sure you have your “primary” display picked out.

Arranging your displays is a key part of working with multiple displays.

Mark Hachman / IDG

If you have a laptop, ensure that the option to preserve the display layout is checked (“Remember window locations based on monitor connection”), especially if you own a Thunderbolt dock. That way everything will remain organized the same if you undock your laptop or not.

Understand how to adjust the size of text and icons

You can find the control to scale Windows here. Experiment to find the right setting.

Mark Hachman / IDG

Why choose one over the other? Because you may instinctively know which icon corresponds to which, no matter if you wear glasses or not. But adjusting the text size may allow you to avoid paying for bifocals while still using Windows effectively.

Get the Windows 11 Taskbar the way you want it

Of all the options here, extending your Taskbar to all of your displays (red) as well as hiding unnecessary icons (blue) are probably the most important.

Mark Hachman / IDG

You can also choose to hide various Taskbar icons, too by toggling off apps you’ll never use. (Bye, Chat.)

Skip the Start menu entirely

If you want an even faster method, simply type Win plus the number of the icon on the taskbar to launch that program—so opening the first taskbar program would be Win + 1, the second would be Win + 2, and so on. Beware, though, as Microsoft appears to have switched up how it counts the icons. On my PC, the “first” icon is File Explorer, not the Start, Search or virtual desktops icon to its left.

Optimize the Windows 11 Start menu

How we use the Start menu isn’t necessarily how you’ll use the Start menu. The Start menu isn’t that great for searching for apps, but it’s surprisingly good for picking up where you left off on a specific document.

File Explorer’s new tabs are the best way to copy files Use File Explorer’s preview pane

Carve out space for you with Do Not Disturb

Notifications can be handy, but not always. Control them!

Mark Hachman / IDG

You can also schedule notifications to be turned off at certain hours with the related control to “Turn on do not disturb automatically”. Your personal time should be your own…especially after hours during a vacation.

Want even more? My colleague Michael Crider lists his favorite “hidden” tips for Windows 11. We’ll have even more Windows tips in the future!

How To Check The Date A Photo Was Taken In Windows 11

Sometimes, you may want to know when a particular photo was taken. It could be for a project, to help you remember an important event, or simply to better organize your digital album. In this article, we will walk you through the process of checking the photo taken date in Windows 11 PC using various methods.

Also see: 3 Free Photo Viewer Apps for Windows 11 or 10

Before we delve into the methods of checking the photo taken date, it’s important to note that not all photos will have this metadata available. The photo taken date is a piece of metadata that is typically stored in a photo file when it is taken by a digital camera or a smartphone. This data is stored in a format known as EXIF (Exchangeable Image File Format), which includes various details such as the camera model, exposure settings, and the date and time the photo was taken.

However, there are several reasons why a photo might not have this metadata. For instance, if the photo was taken with a device that doesn’t record EXIF data, such as an older camera, the photo taken date may not be available. Additionally, some photo editing software and social media platforms strip out metadata for privacy reasons or to reduce file size. Photos that have been downloaded from such platforms or edited with such software may not contain the photo taken date.

Furthermore, if a photo is a screenshot, a downloaded image from the internet, or a scan of a physical photo, it will not have the original photo taken date in the metadata, as this information wasn’t recorded at the time the image was created. In these cases, the creation date of the digital file might be available, but this is not the same as the photo taken date.

In the event that the photo taken date metadata does not exist in a photo, unfortunately, there’s no reliable way to find out when exactly the photo was taken. The best you can do is to estimate based on other available information, such as the content of the photo, the file’s creation date, or any other context you might have. Now, let’s move on to the methods of checking the photo taken date in Windows 11.

Useful tip: How to change a file’s date & timestamp via CMD or PowerShell

Windows File Explorer provides an easy way to check the photo taken date by accessing the file’s properties. Follow these simple steps:

Navigate to the folder containing the photo you want to check.

In the Properties window, switch to the Details tab.

Under the Origin section, you will find the Date taken field, which displays the date and time the photo was taken.

If you have a folder containing many photos and you want to view the date taken for all of them at once, you can add a “Date taken” column to File Explorer. Here’s how to do it:

Open File Explorer and navigate to the folder containing your photos.

In the Choose Details window that appears, scroll down and find Date taken or Date Picture Taken.

Now, you will see the Date taken or Date Picture Taken column in File Explorer, showing the date each photo was taken.

If you prefer a different column arrangement, simply drag the Date taken column to your preferred location.

Linked issue: Windows 11 File Explorer Not Refreshing Automatically

Another way to check the photo taken date is by using the built-in Windows 11 Photos app. Here’s how:

Navigate to the photo you want to check, either by browsing your folders or using the search function.

A sidebar will appear, displaying various information about the photo, including the Date taken.

Related problem: Windows 11 Photos App Not Working or Crashing

Copy and paste the following PowerShell script to display the photo taken date: $photoPath = "C:folderphoto.jpg" $shellApp = New-Object -ComObject Shell.Application $photoFolder = Split-Path -Parent $photoPath $photoFileName = Split-Path -Leaf $photoPath $folder = $shellApp.NameSpace($photoFolder) $file = $folder.ParseName($photoFileName) # Get the index of the "Date Taken" property $dateTakenPropertyIndex = 12 # Assuming "Date Taken" is at index 12, adjust if necessary # Get the value of the "Date Taken" property $dateTaken = $folder.GetDetailsOf($file, $dateTakenPropertyIndex) $shellApp = $null # Release the COM object # Check if the "Date Taken" property value is empty if ([string]::IsNullOrEmpty($dateTaken)) { Write-Host "Failed to retrieve the date taken information." } else { Write-Host "Date Taken: $dateTaken" }

Replace C:folderphoto.jpg with the path to the photo you want to check the date taken for.

Press Enter, and PowerShell will display the photo taken date.

Recommended resource: How to Reduce Photo File Size in Windows 11

Now that you’re familiar with various methods to check the photo taken date in Windows 11 and understand the limitations of photo metadata, you can make better use of this information in organizing and managing your digital photo collection.

However, photo’s metadata such as the photo taken date isn’t always available due to a variety of factors, ranging from the device used to capture the image to the editing or sharing platform that may strip away metadata for various reasons. In such cases, you might have to rely on other clues to determine the date of the photograph, such as the context of the image, other files saved around the same time, or even your own memory.

Consider using a photo management software that allows you to view and edit metadata, such as Adobe Lightroom. These tools can help you organize your photos based on various criteria, including dates, locations, and keywords. By adding or changing tags and custom metadata fields, you can further enhance the organization of your photo collection.

Additionally, it’s important to be aware of the privacy implications of photo metadata. While sharing your photos online, consider using tools or settings that strip out sensitive metadata, such as GPS coordinates, to protect your privacy.

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