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As with all operating systems, the way a Linux game behaves on a computer is largely dependent on the design of the game, the graphics hardware and drivers the user has, and the settings one chooses. Native Linux games are typically better at supporting the computer’s default resolution without much tweaking, but the way it handles fullscreen display on a a dual-monitor system depends on the game engine employed.

This brief guide to various types of games you can run in Linux on a dual-monitor system is based on my experience with an Nvidia 3D graphics card and the accompanying proprietary drivers. Nevertheless, most of it will apply to all 3D graphics cards. This guide also assumes that you already have your dual-monitor setup functioning by utilizing Xinerama, TwinView, XRandR, or some other method. This does not apply to dual-monitor setups that use separate Xorg instances for each monitor.

The Problem

When running a game, either as a native Linux application or through Wine, you have probably encountered one of these situations:

1. The game takes over both monitors and stretches the images over both.

2. One screen goes dark, and the other screen displays the game correctly. This may be found for many users.

3. The game maximizes on one screen, but it is not the screen you want to use.

The Solutions

Unfortunately, there is no one solution for all three situations, but there are a few ways to fix them, depending on your preferences.

Windowed Play

Although this may seem like more of a workaround, you can actually have a game run in a window and then turn that window into a fullscreen one. Follow these steps:

1. Configure the game to run in a window. For many Linux games, this might involve editing the configuration file, usually found in ~/.game-name/

2. Set the game’s resolution to your desktop’s exact resolution.

3. Start the game.

Single Full Screen

On nearly all native Linux games that I have encountered, you can achieve true fullscreen results simply by configuring the game to use the resolution of one monitor. This, however, does not guarantee that it will be on the screen you want.

A universal method is to use xrandr to turn off one of the monitors. For example, you can run the following command in a terminal:

$

  xrandr

--output

MONITORNAME

--off

There are also graphical xrandr programs available, such as krandtray (Resize and Rotate) or gnome-randr-applet (Display Geometry Switcher). In either case, simply select the monitor you want to turn off and disable it, or in the case of a large virtual display (such as the kind with TwinView), select the smaller resolution.

For SDL games, you can setup an environment variable that will force it to use the screen you want, and this will dim the unused screen as long as you are playing.

$

 

export

SDL_VIDEO_FULLSCREEN_HEAD

=

2

The number indicates the display number of the monitor, so change it according to your needs. You can even plug this into the game’s startup script and make it all automatic.

Windows Games in Wine

There is an easy way to use a windowed mode in Wine:

1. Start Wine Configuration (winecfg)

3. Check ‘Emulate a virtual desktop’

4. Next to ‘Desktop size’ enter your exact screen resolution.

When you start Wine applications, it will have a Windows desktop in the background. When starting games, the games should go fullscreen with no window border.

This should prevent Windows games from stretching over both screens and give you a fullscreen experience.

There are other options available for fullscreen gaming on dual monitors, and the only way to find the best method for your setup is to experiment with different techniques.

Tavis J. Hampton

Tavis J. Hampton is a freelance writer from Indianapolis. He is an avid user of free and open source software and strongly believes that software and knowledge should be free and accessible to all people. He enjoys reading, writing, teaching, spending time with his family, and playing with gadgets.

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How To Run A Linux Command As Another User

If you are an experienced Linux user, you know that sometimes you need to run a command as another user. This can be necessary for various reasons, such as running a command that requires root privileges or running a command that belongs to another user. In this article, we will explain how to run a Linux command as another user.

Understanding User Accounts in Linux

Before we dive into the specifics of running a command as another user, it is important to understand the concept of user accounts in Linux. Every user in Linux has a unique user ID (UID) and a corresponding username. Additionally, every user belongs to at least one group, which is identified by a group ID (GID) and a group name.

When you log in to a Linux system, you are assigned a user account that determines your permissions and access to system resources. By default, you have limited privileges and cannot perform certain actions that require elevated permissions. However, you can use the sudo command to temporarily elevate your privileges and perform administrative tasks.

Using the su Command to Run a Command as Another User

The su command in Linux allows you to switch to another user account and run commands as that user. To use the su command, you must have the password of the user account you want to switch to. Here is the syntax of the su command:

su [options] [username]

[options]: This parameter specifies any optional arguments that modify the behavior of the su command. For example, you can use the -c option to specify the command to run as the target user.

[username]: This parameter specifies the username of the target user account.

When you run the su command without any options, you are prompted to enter the password of the target user account. Once you enter the correct password, you are switched to that user’s account and can run commands as that user.

Here is an example of how to use the su command to run a command as another user:

su john -c "ls /home/john"

In this example, we are running the ls command as the user john. The -c option specifies the command to run, and the argument "ls /home/john" specifies the directory to list.

Using the sudo Command to Run a Command as Another User

Another way to run a command as another user is to use the sudo command. Unlike the su command, the sudo command does not require you to enter the password of the target user account. Instead, you must have the permission to run commands as that user.

To run a command as another user using the sudo command, you must specify the -u option followed by the username of the target user. Here is the syntax of the sudo command:

sudo -u [username] [command]

-u [username]: This option specifies the username of the target user account.

[command]: This parameter specifies the command to run as the target user.

Here is an example of how to use the sudo command to run a command as another user:

sudo -u john ls /home/john

In this example, we are running the ls command as the user john. The -u john option specifies the target user, and the argument /home/john specifies the directory to list.

Conclusion

Running a Linux command as another user can be useful in many situations, such as when you need to run a command that requires elevated privileges or when you need to access files or directories that belong to another user. In this article, we explained how to use the su and sudo commands to run a command as another user. By following these instructions, you can perform administrative tasks and access system resources with ease.

5 Best Dual Monitor Stand For Curved Monitors: Our Top Picks

5 Best Dual Monitor Stand for Curved Monitors: Our Top Picks

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A dual monitor setup and increased productivity go hand in hand. It is a necessity for working professionals who enter or deal with data all day long. That said, to make the most of your dual monitor setup, you also need a sturdy dual monitor arm. Monitor arms help you to better organize your workspace, offering more space on your desk for other devices. There are tons of monitor arms available on the market. However, not all of them support curved monitors. In this article, we have listed the best dual monitor stand for curved monitor and gaming to help you create an ergonomic and comfortable computer setup. Note: Deals are subject to change. Keep in mind that the price tag often varies. We recommend going on the vendor’s website to check the price. Some of the products may be out of stock by the time you’ve made your purchasing decision. So, hurry up and hit the buy button.

HUANUO dual monitor stand offers a wide range of motion and solid built quality along with sleek design. It comes in one color and capable of handling dual monitors of 23” to 27” in size. The monitors must have a VESA hole pattern for it to work.

HUANUO dual monitor stand offers an ergonomically healthy viewing position with 45-degree of tilt and a 180-degree swivel and 360-degree ration. You can place your monitors in both landscape and portrait positions.

Pros:

Excellent dual monitor stand with the solid build quality

Supports both landscape and portrait position

Supports 360-degree rotation

Cons:

Nothing noticeable

Check price

Vivo’s dual-LED/LCD monitor freestanding desk stand is a fully adjustable monitor arm. It comes with dual mounting arms for 27” monitors. Unlike HUANUO, Vivo dual monitor stand comes with a base thus allowing you to place it on your desk.

If you want, you can bolt down the stand for more stability and save some space on your desk. The monitor stand offers an all-steel construction with a heavy-duty base. It also offers full articulation with 90-degree tilt, 180-degree swivel and 360-degree rotation offering ergonomic setup.

Pros:

Solid steel construction dual monitor stand with a base

Fully adjustable arms for greater flexibility

Easy installation with base and optional bolt mounting support

Cons:

Some complaints about the quality

Check price

If you have large size monitors, the WALI Premium dual LCD monitor desk stand supports dual 32” monitors of up to 17.6lbs. Unlike Vivo, Wali’s monitor stand requires to be mounted on the desk with the bolts.

WALI Premium stand offers fully adjustable gas spring with 35-degree tilt 90-degree swivel and 36-degree rotation with max height up to 23.62 for increased productivity without stressing your neck.

Expert tip:

Large size dual monitor arm with gas spring design

Fully adjustable monitor arms with greater flexibility

High-grade material C-clamp for stability

Cons:

Nothing noticeable

Check price

EleTab’s dual arm monitor stand comes with a gas spring that perfectly balances the weight of the display and provides a smooth adjustment motion. The full-motion design of the stand allows you to twist and turn your monitor in multiple directions with ease.

EleTab Dual Arm Monitor Stand comes with a universal fit and can accommodate all shapes and sizes from 17” to 27” with each arm capable of holding up to 14.3 lbs weight.

Pros:

High-quality dual monitor stand with gas sprint

A fully adjustable monitor arm with portrait and landscape support

Universal fit support up to 27” size monitors

Cons:

Nothing noticeable

Check price

HUANUO comes with solid robotic-like arms and the gas spring allows you to raise your monitor to eye level to prevent neck strains. The stand requires to be bolt down to the desk thus saving more space on your work desk.

HUANUO stand offers fully adjustable arms with conventional, swivel, tilt and rotate functionalities. The monitors can be set up in portrait as well as landscape mode.

Pros:

High-quality dual monitor stand for curved monitors

Gas spring feature for flexibility

Ergonomic monitor raiser

Cons:

Nothing noticeable

Check price Final thoughts on the dual monitor stands for curved monitors and gaming

A dual monitor setup can have a dramatic effect on your productivity. You can further make your setup more ergonomic and comfortable by adding a dual monitor arm to your desk. These metallic arms offer stability, clutter-free desk along with comfort all day.

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Start a conversation

A dual monitor setup and increased productivity go hand in hand. It is a necessity for working professionals who enter or deal with data all day long. That said, to make the most of your dual monitor setup, you also need a sturdy dual monitor arm. Monitor arms help you to better organize your workspace, offering more space on your desk for other devices. There are tons of monitor arms available on the market. However, not all of them support curved monitors. In this article, we have listed the best dual monitor stand for curved monitor and gaming to help you create an ergonomic and comfortable computer setup.: Deals are subject to change. Keep in mind that the price tag often varies. We recommend going on the vendor’s website to check the price. Some of the products may be out of stock by the time you’ve made your purchasing decision. So, hurry up and hit the buy button.

How To Remove Symbolic Links In Linux

Symbolic links, also known as symlinks, are files that act as pointers to other files or directories. They are commonly used in Linux and other Unix-based operating systems to create shortcuts or aliases to files and directories, making it easier to access them.

However, there may be times when you need to remove a symbolic link. This could be because the linked file or directory is no longer needed, or because the link is broken and needs to be fixed.

In this article, we’ll explore how to remove symbolic links in Linux, including some related concepts and methods that may help to clarify the topic.

Prerequisites

Before we dive into the details of removing symbolic links, it’s important to understand some basic concepts related to file systems in Linux.

Understanding File Systems in Linux

In Linux, file systems are organized into a hierarchical structure, with the root directory (/) at the top. Each directory can contain files and other directories, which can in turn contain more files and directories.

The file system hierarchy in Linux is often represented as a tree, with the root directory at the top and each directory represented as a branch. Each leaf node in the tree represents a file.

Understanding Symbolic Links

Symbolic links are files that act as pointers to other files or directories. They are created using the ln command, with the -s option to indicate that a symbolic link should be created.

For example, to create a symbolic link to a file called myfile.txt, you would use the following command:

ln -s chúng tôi /path/to/mylink

This would create a symbolic link called mylink in the directory /path/to/, which points to the file /path/to/myfile.txt.

Symbolic links are useful because they allow you to create shortcuts or aliases to files and directories, making it easier to access them. However, they can also cause problems if they become broken or point to the wrong location.

How to Remove Symbolic Links

Now that we understand the basics of file systems and symbolic links, let’s explore how to remove symbolic links in Linux.

Using the rm Command

The easiest way to remove a symbolic link in Linux is to use the rm command. This command is used to remove files and directories, and can also be used to remove symbolic links.

To remove a symbolic link using the rm command, simply specify the path to the link as the argument:

rm /path/to/mylink

This will remove the symbolic link called mylink in the directory /path/to/.

If you want to remove a symbolic link without being prompted for confirmation, you can use the -f option:

rm -f /path/to/mylink

This will force the removal of the symbolic link without prompting for confirmation.

Using the unlink Command

Another way to remove a symbolic link in Linux is to use the unlink command. This command is specifically designed to remove symbolic links, and is equivalent to using the rm command with the -i option.

To remove a symbolic link using the unlink command, simply specify the path to the link as the argument:

unlink /path/to/mylink

This will remove the symbolic link called mylink in the directory /path/to/.

Using the find Command

If you need to remove multiple symbolic links at once, you can use the find command to search for and remove all links that match a certain pattern.

For example, to remove all symbolic links in the directory /path/to/ that end with the extension .link, you could use the following command:

find /path/to/ -type l -name "*.link" -delete

This command uses the find command to search for all files of type l (symbolic links) in the directory /path/to/ that match the pattern *.link, and then deletes them using the -delete option.

Conclusion

In this article, we’ve explored how to remove symbolic links in Linux using various commands and methods. We’ve also discussed some related concepts and methods that may help to clarify the topic.

By understanding how symbolic links work and how to remove them, you can better manage your file system and prevent issues caused by broken or incorrect links.

Run Your Own Pastebin With Stikked

If you’re a developer of any sort, you’ve probably heard of chúng tôi the most widely used web application for pasting and sharing text snippets. chúng tôi is great, but it’s not the only pastebin tool out there.

Stikked is built with PHP and jQuery and uses the CodeIgniter framework.

Installing Stikked

Stikked requires that your server is running:

PHP 5

Apache

MySQL

To download the latest version of Stikked, visit the Stikked GitHub page or go to your command line and run:

Create a database, add a user to it, and grant the database user all privileges.

Now that you’ve set up a database for your Stikked installation, you need to modify the file application/config/stikked.php to point to it. Go to lines 18 through 21 and change the database information appropriately. For example:

$config

[

'db_hostname'

]

=

'127.0.0.1'

;

$config

[

'db_database'

]

=

'rujic_stikked'

;

$config

[

'db_username'

]

=

'rujic_rujic'

;

$config

[

'db_password'

]

=

'stikked'

;

Now you should be able to access chúng tôi and see this:

The chúng tôi file contains some other settings you can change as well. For instance, to require LDAP authentication, edit line 117:

$config

[

'require_auth'

]

=

true

;

Note that if you set this to true, you must also configure your LDAP settings in application/config/auth_ldap.php.

Fun fact: Line 99 lets you let you set the default name for anonymous posters to a random phrase:

$config

[

'unknown_poster'

]

=

'random'

;

Scroll down to line 136 to view or edit the list of random nouns, followed by the list of random adjectives.

Styling Your Stikked Installation

All of the style data exists in the directory called “static.” For kicks, take a look inside the sub-directory “fonts” to see some interesting choices.

@font-face

{

font-family

:

font19

;

src

:

url

(

'../fonts/font19.ttf'

)

;

}

Here is my “Create” page after I had a bunch of fun with main.css:

Features

Stikked has a number of interesting features that make it stand out from the crowd of other pastebin scripts.

First off, it runs the gamut when it comes to syntax highlighting. Stikked supports a huge list of programming and scripting languages, from 4CS to Oz to ZXBasic. Whatever you’re coding in, your Stikked installation has (probably) got you covered.

The “Trending” page is nearly identical but with the addition of a “hits” column and no RSS feed. Hits appear to be calculated based on visits from unique IP addresses.

When you create a paste, you have the options to set an expiration date, create a short URL using the service at chúng tôi and/or make the post private. Note that a “private” paste is not truly private; any user who has the paste’s URL can see it, unless you’ve enabled LDAP authentication – in that case, every registered user with the URL can see it. “Private” only means that the post won’t show up on the Recent or Trending pages.

Security aside, Stikked provides some neat utilities for viewing a paste. I’m especially pleased with the embed code.

You can also reply to pastes and add your own edits from a form below the original paste. The only downside to this is that replies don’t link back to the original post; if your pastebin has many different posts and replies made at different times, it’s easy to lose track of their structure. I can only hope that the developer will at some point introduce a solution, such as threading the replies and implementing a diff viewer.

One last feature I’ll mention is spam control, which Stikked refers to as “spamadmin.” Set it up by entering credentials in config/stikked.php on lines 79 and 80:

$config

[

'spamadmin_user'

]

=

'stikked'

;

$config

[

'spamadmin_pass'

]

=

'stikked'

;

Go to chúng tôi to log in. There you can see which pastes came from which IP addresses, remove pastes, and block IP ranges.

API

A basic example is to use the cURL command to upload a file called “smalltalk.st,” setting the title, name, privacy, language, and expiration time in minutes:

Conclusion

If you’ve read that Stikked is dead, you’re wrong. While the old Stikked was abandoned after version 0.5.4, the new Stikked is going strong and continuing to introduce useful features with every release. I recommend you give it a try if you want an easy way to collect and share text snippets on your own website.

What do you use pastebins for? Do you have a use for your own pastebin?

Rebecca “Ruji” Chapnik

Ruji Chapnik is a freelance creator of miscellanea, including but not limited to text and images. She studied art at the University of California, Santa Cruz and writing at Portland State University. She went on to study Linux in her bedroom and also in various other people’s bedrooms, crouched anti-ergonomically before abandoned Windows computers. Ruji currently lives in Portland, Oregon. You can find her experiments at chúng tôi and her comics at dondepresso.rujic.net.

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How To Setup Hdmi Digital Playback In Linux

Like many people, I have an HDTV in my house that supports HDMI input devices, such as Blu-ray players. I also like to watch streaming content over the Internet, downloaded videos, and listen to music all from my TV and home theater system. Unfortunately, I do not have a Boxee box or a Roku box. All I have is a Blu-ray player that supports very few video formats and only offers a few streaming options, such as Netflix.

Fortunately, I can run Boxee from any computer, but rather than buying a dedicated box just for that, I can use my Eee PC, which has HDMI output. Many laptop manufacturers are adding HDMI out connectors to their devices specifically for this purpose, so that customers can display their content on big screen televisions.

If you happen to be one of those people and have chosen Linux for your laptop or computer with HDMI out, this brief tutorial should help you get video and sound working.

Initial Preparation

Generally speaking, if your computer or laptop has an HDMI connector, it will play fullscreen HD videos. All you need to do is configure Linux to use it. From my experience, current versions of most Linux distributions will treat an HDMI output just like a VGA out, needing very little configuration. It should auto-detect your external screen, even if it does not immediately display anything. You can use a tool like XRandR, Disper, or nvidia-settings to easily setup the resolution settings you want.

For example, your XRandR or Disper string may look like this:

xrandr

--output

HDMI-

0

--mode

1280x720

--right-of

DVI-

0

or

disper

-S

-r

1280x720 Audio Setup

HDMI video was the easy part. Unfortunately, various Linux audio systems view an HDMI audio output in different ways. If you are using Ubuntu or another distribution that uses Pulseaudio, you should use the Pulseaudio Volume Control program. To use it:

1. Press Alt+F2, type “pavucontrol”, and press Enter

By default, the Profile will be something like “Analog Stereo Duplex”. “Analog” refers to your device’s normal speakers.

4. Select “Digital Stereo (HDMI) Output” from the list.

Now all audio will be routed through the TV’s speakers.

In KDE, any players that use Phonon, such as Dragon Player or Amarok, use KDE’s configuration settings, and you can select the HDMI output from there as well. To do this:

1. Open System Settings

No Pulseaudio or Phonon

If you only need to turn on HDMI audio for a particular application, such as XBMC, simply configure the individual application to use the HDMI output.

For other applications that do not have built-in digital playback support, you will need to configure Alsa manually. Boxee, for example, should work just like XBMC, but there appears to be a bug that prevents digital output. The first thing you need to do is find out which device number your HDMI out is using. From a terminal, type:

aplay

-L

Look for devices with “hw” in front, and one of them should include HDMI that looks similar to this:

hw:

CARD

=NVidia,

DEV

=

3

HDA NVidia, NVIDIA HDMI

As you can see in this example, my audio card is “NVidia”, and the device number is “3”. Assuming you only have one card, the card number will be 0.

Next, create a text file in your home directory called “asoundrc-hdmi”, and include the following (replacing “hw:0,3” with your actual device number):

pcm.dmixer

{

type

dmix ipc_key

1024

ipc_key_add_uid

false

ipc_perm 0660 slave

{

pcm

"hw:0,3"

rate

48000

channels

2

period_time

0

period_size

1024

buffer_time

0

buffer_size

4096

}

}

pcm.

!

default

{

type

plug slave.pcm

"dmixer"

}

Save the file. If you already have a default .asoundrc file, you should back it up and copy the asoundrc-hdmi to .asoundrc

mv

.asoundrc asoundrc-backup

cp

asoundrc-hdmi .asoundrc

If you want to switch to this setting every time your media program starts, you could create a script:

#!/bin/bash

mv

/

home

/

user

/

asoundrc-hdmi

/

home

/

user

/

.asoundrc

sleep

3

/

opt

/

boxee

/

Boxee

&

amp;

wait

mv

/

home

/

user

/

.asoundrc

/

home

/

user

/

asoundrc-hdmi HD Playback

Now all of your HDMI video and audio should run smoothly, and you did not have to purchase a media center box to get it.

Tavis J. Hampton

Tavis J. Hampton is a freelance writer from Indianapolis. He is an avid user of free and open source software and strongly believes that software and knowledge should be free and accessible to all people. He enjoys reading, writing, teaching, spending time with his family, and playing with gadgets.

Subscribe to our newsletter!

Our latest tutorials delivered straight to your inbox

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By signing up, you agree to our Privacy Policy and European users agree to the data transfer policy. We will not share your data and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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