Trending February 2024 # Taylordle Words: Find A Hint Easily A List Taylor Swift Words # Suggested March 2024 # Top 4 Popular

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Fan of Wordle? Even bigger fan of Taylor Swift? Then, you are probably already in the know about Taylordle, the sparkling new offspring of the viral word game, Wordle, that has turned the Swiftie universe topsy-turvy.

Just in case you haven’t caught on yet, let me bring you up to speed. Taylordle is a Wordle spin-off developed by Holy Swift Podcast as an exclusive treasure pack for all the Swifties. All the rules of the original game apply to Taylordle as well — you get 6 chances to guess a 5-letter word based on colored hints, once a day, every day — the twist begins with the solution word list. While any recognized 5-letter word could make an accepted guess, only those words that have a direct relation to the hit-maker herself can be the solution word.

Sounds easy, right? But, once you start playing, you might start singing another tune about the real difficulty involved, and we will tell you why.

Related: 6 Ways to Play Old Wordle Puzzles: Step-by-step Guides With Pictures

What makes the Taylordle Dictionary?

Taylor Swift is famous in the circle for her extensive discography, her impeccable rhyming skills, and her ability to pen instant hits in a span of seconds. The cumulative result is a seemingly bottomless reservoir of lyrical variety — and any tiny speck from this abyss, as long as it is a 5-letter word, could be the solution word for the players of Taylordle.

Taking a nosedive into the abyss of Taylor Swift lyrics to find the answer might find you drowning for naught — because the source list of Taylordle goes much, much beyond Taylor Swift’s song list or lyrics.

In essence, Taylordle is a challenge designed to test every Swiftie’s knowledge about Taylor Swift — this includes everyone on Taylor’s acquaintance roster (at least all the publicized friendships and famous foes, it could even be her significant other or he-who-must-not-be-named in the Swift universe), running memes…or even her favorite drink.

There is nothing out of scope to what could possibly make the solution list (given the vastness of her lyrical contributions to the music industry to all the media-borne memes owing to her fame and popularity).

That unequivocally calls for a cheat sheet of some order… at least a word list to turn to when you are at your wit’s end on the final guess.

Related: What are the Average Number of Guesses in Wordle?

Taylordle Words: A list of Taylor Swift 5-letter words

SPOILER ALERT: The following list is compiled as a reference for the players. It may contain words that are or could be the solution words of previous or upcoming Taylordle games. Read at your own risk! You have been warned!)

Swifties who are now addicted to Taylordle have figured out that their guesses should go beyond the singular trajectory of songs, lyrics, or album titles to include names that are associated with her. Although not anywhere near complete, we have compiled for you 130 potential Taylordle words for you in a list-form, it also includes everything from song titles to 5-letter names of the pop singer’s famous friends, artists/bands she has collaborated with, people she has famous beef with or even recently reconciled — therefore, may entail spoilers! Now… let’s explore the word list of the Swift-verse.

5-letter Taylor Swift words “A to D” list

Aaron

After

Again

Agron

Alana

Album

Alwyn

Award

Becky

Begin

Benji

Betty

Blake

Blame

Blank

Blood

Braun

Brett

Chick

Chris

Civil

Clean

Coney

Conor

Crime

Cruel

Curls

Death

Debut

Disco

Dixie

Dream

Dress

Drops

5-letter Taylor Swift words “E to K” list

Ellen

Ellie

Exile

Fairy

Faith

Fifty

First

Girls

Giver

Gomez

Grace

Great

Hadid

Hands

Happy

Harry

Heart

Horse

Jaime

James

Jimmy

Joker

Jonas

Kanye

Keith

Kitty

Kloss

5-letter Taylor Swift words “L to Q” list

Lakes

Latte

Light

Lorax

Lorde

Loved

Lover

Lucas

Lucky

Maple

Maren

Mayer

Movie

Never

Night

Opera

Other

Panic

Paper

Peace

Perry

Piano

Place

Queen

5-letter Taylor Swift words “R to T” list

Radio

Ready

Remix

Right

Rings

Romeo

Ronan

Scarf

Scott

Seven

Shake

Shawn

Short

Smile

Snake

Sound

Space

Spark

Speak

Squad

State

Stone

Story

Style

Sugar

Super

Swift

Taffy

Tails

Tears

Thing

Think

Today

Tours

Twain

5-letter Taylor Swift words “U to Y” list

Urban

Vault

Voice

White

Woman

Woods

World

Write

Years

Young

Even though Taylordle has proven to be more challenging to crack than Wordle according to veteran fans of both the artist and the word games, the chances of nailing it on the first try are higher than it is on Wordle.

A one-guess wonder is not impossible, especially if we have a dependable word list to waddle through. Even though the one above can only be deemed as the tip of an iceberg, it is somewhere to start, right?

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The Perfect Classroom Gift: A Gift Of Words

I belong to a book club, one that has continued since 1990. Think of all the books we have read together. And we’re serious about this, too. We’re not one of those clubs that gather together to eat and then never talk about the book. We talk about the book.

One month a year we read a play out loud — assign parts, read from beginning to end. We are not a group of actors and it’s a cold reading, but we enjoy it. Sometimes we read and then go to the play; sometimes we see the play first and then read. Both work.

Once a year, in December, we each buy a book of poetry, mark in some way a poem or two that we particularly like, wrap it attractively and bring it to book club. We have this crazy little ritual where we put all the books on the dining room table and then walk around the table. At some unknown signal that we all recognize we stop and take the package in front of us. And then we open our gifts, one at a time, and read the chosen poem out loud to the whole group. What a wonderful evening of words, a breathless barrage of ideas, images, stories. We enjoy meeting our old favorites, delight in exploring new poets. We go home fulfilled.

Twenty-five years equals 250 books read, 25 plays acted out, and 25 evenings of poetry.

In the Classroom

“How can I replicate this poetry experience in my classroom?” I wondered as I drove home that first December of the book club. “I can’t ask my students to spend 10 dollars or more but they have to experience what I just experienced.” And out of that came what I call “the gift of words.”

Okay, class, here’s what I want you to bring with you on the last day of school before winter break. I want you to find a poem, a saying, a paragraph you like — something that speaks to you because of its message, its beauty, its format. I want you to copy it onto a piece of paper, put it into a box, and wrap it. Be sure to include, before you wrap it, the name of the author and your name as the giver.

When the day came, students placed their packages on my desk. They varied from huge to tiny, from carefully wrapped to hurriedly tossed together. And yes, there were those who forgot, who scribbled “Just do it” on a piece of notebook paper, folded it like a paper football, and added it to the pile. I provided a few extra, just in case.

How to start. “Whose birthday is closest to Christmas? Okay, you’re first. Pick any present you want.” Suspense. What would she get? I was not disappointed. The contents varied — favorites from “Where the Sidewalk Ends” by Shel Silverstein to Bible verses, song lyrics, and short sayings like “Just do it.” The experiment was a success. Everyone in the class had a gift and I had the greatest gift of all.

With Adults

Since that December in 1990 the idea of a gift of words has spread out of the classroom — into professional development meetings, into family gatherings. When Center X at UCLA wanted to “celebrate” my pseudo-retirement, my first words were, “No gifts.” “How about a gift of words?” was their response.

And that is what I received: a basketful of little boxes, beautifully packaged, each holding a precious gift — words just for me. I savor each message. My favorite was by James Michener: “I love writing. I love the swirl and the swing of words as they tangle with human emotions.”

I have watched the words swirl and swing in my book club, in my classroom, in my writing groups. I could not ask for a better gift.

30 Trigger Words To Use In Your Online Writing For More Connections & Results

Imagine this: you publish a blog post that you’ve worked for a full week on. You wrote it, re-wrote it, edited it, and fine-tuned it and now you’re ready to share it with the world.

Naturally, you send a proud announcement to your email list. Only to find that just a few of them even open it, and far fewer of them read it.

It’s a disappointing cycle.

Fortunately – the problem isn’t your writing. It’s the words you’re choosing to use.

30 Trigger Words You Should be Using in Your Online Writing for Bigger, Better Results

Luckily for you, there is a virtual treasure chest of so-called “trigger” words you can use in your online copywriting for better results. Here are thirty of my favorites – in a graphic you can save, and listed below.

1. Personalized Words: Your Reader’s Name

If you’re sending out a promotional email, you might want to consider playing the name game. According to MarketingSherpa, simply adding a customer’s name to a marketing email can increase your open rate by 137%.   Those are odds most marketers are eager to take. The reason adding a customer’s name to an email headline is so effective is that it triggers a portion of the brain that handles recognition.

2. Affirmative Words: “Yes” 3. Attention-Grabbing Words: “You”

If you’re going to talk to your followers like friends, which you should be doing, you need to reach out to them personally. While using their name is one way to do this, addressing them directly is another. The word “you” grabs a reader’s attention and helps them feel like you’ve created this marketing email specifically for their benefit. Additionally, the word “you” is conversational enough that it helps readers relate to your content and engage with your message.

4. Reason Words – “Because”

Your readers are smart. They need a reason to believe what you’re saying and to take the action you’re asking them to take. Because of this (See what I did there?), using the word “Because” in your online copywriting can be an effective way to lay out cause-and-effect scenarios and inspire confidence.

5. Novelty Words – “New”

People love new things, and making it clear to your readers that something contained within your email or online copywriting is “new” can drive them crazy with excitement. Humans are programmed for novelty and the prospect of something new and exciting is a great way to boost engagement. Additionally, promising something new and exciting can help your marketing email stand out from the dozens your customers are inevitably seeing in their inbox on a daily basis.

6. Wonder Words – “Discover,” “Unlock”

7. Bargain Words – “Free”

Nearly everyone loves a good deal. By including the word “Free” in your online copywriting, you can appeal to your readers’ sense of economy and assure them that what you’re offering truly is a bargain. Additionally, promising something for free is a great way to grab attention and promote engagement.

8. High-ROI Words – “Amazing” 9. Immediate Response Words – “Act now”

Customers respond to a demand for immediacy, and including words like “Now,” “Today,” or “Limited time” in your online copywriting – especially your CTAs – can go a long way toward earning you more engagement.

10. One-stop-shop Words – “Everything”

Today, people want expansive content that offers them knowledge, context, and relevance all in one place. By assuring them that a blog post teaches them “Everything they need to know” about a topic or a news story, you can appeal to a reader’s sense of efficiency.

11. Minimal Risk Words – “Guarantee” 12. Simple Words – “Easy”

13. Reliable Words – “Proven”

Again, customers want a sure thing. Remind them that your content is backed up by statistics and research by using the word “proven” in your marketing.

14. Absolute Solution Words – “The”

Customers don’t want just any five solutions for B2B content creation, they want the five solutions for B2B content creation.

15. Solution Words – “How to” 16. Quality Words – “Premium”

The word “Premium” lets customers know that your product is the best in the industry, which encourages consumer confidence and inspires trust in your brand.

17. Low-obligation Words – “No obligation” 18. Abundant Words – “More”

Customers want to know that they’re making a smart decision by working with your company. Because of this, using the word “more” in your online copywriting helps ensure your customers that they’re making a good decision by working with you instead of your competition.

19. Money-back Words – “100% Money-Back Guarantee”

Appeal to your customers’ sense of thrift and fear of obligation by assuring them that they can get their money back if they’re not satisfied with your services.

20. VIP Words – “Elite”

Let your customers know that they’re part of an exclusive club by using words like “Elite” or “VIP” in your marketing. In addition to helping customers feel special, these words also signify the quality and rarity of your product.

21. Coveted Information Words – “Secret”

Let your customers know they’re gaining access to something coveted by providing your top five “Secret” tips or exposing them to the “Secrets” of the pros. In addition to inspiring a sense of wonder, the word “Secret” ensures readers they’re accessing high-quality information.

22. Immediate Reward Words – “Instant”

23. Hypothetical Words – “If”

Hypothetical scenarios trigger a reader’s sense of wonder and excitement. What if your reader chose to make this decision? How would their life change if? Adding the word “If” to your online copywriting can have a huge impact on its overall success. Especially when used in the context of “If this, then that.”

24. Fear-inducing Words – “Worse”

25. Short Timeframe Words – “Today”

The concept of “Today” is something that virtually everyone can put their hands on. By letting customers in to an offer that lasts for today only or telling them about a webinar scheduled for today, you can easily boost your conversion rates and encourage a sense of immediacy in your readers.

26. Herd Mentality Words – “Everyone”

Tim Ferriss is a great example of this, in his podcast CTA from iTunes:

27. Real-life Words – “Real World Solutions”

28. Negative Benefit Words – “Never” 29. Desire-focused Words – “Want” 30. Add-on Words – “P.S.”

Adding a simple P.S. or post-script to your emails can be a great way to help your customers feel like they’re getting an added goodie at the end of your content. Many popular bloggers, including Mark Manson, practice this in their marketing content. P.S. pieces are especially effective when you have something extra to offer or are extending a benefit only available to your email subscribers.

The Case for Trigger Words

While none of these words may shock or awe you on their own, they can transform your content when used correctly.

Begin using them in your content and watch how your conversion and engagement rates improve!

Image credits

Feature image (c) Julia McCoy

Infographic image (c) Express Writers & Julia McCoy

List A Few Statistical Methods Available For A Numpy Array

In this article, we will show you a list of a few statistical methods of NumPy library in python.

Statistics is dealing with collecting and analyzing data. It describes methods for collecting samples, describing data, and concluding data. NumPy is the core package for scientific calculations, hence NumPy statistical Functions go hand in hand.

Numpy has a number of statistical functions that can be used to do statistical data analysis. Let us discuss a few of them here.

numpy.amin() and numpy.amax()

These functions return the minimum and the maximum from the elements in the given array along the specified axis.

Example

inputArray

=

np

.

array

(

[

[

2

,

6

,

3

]

,

[

1

,

5

,

4

]

,

[

8

,

12

,

9

]

]

)

print

(

‘Input Array is:’

)

print

(

inputArray

)

print

(

)

print

(

“Minimum element in an array:”

,

np

.

amin

(

inputArray

)

)

print

(

)

print

(

“Maximum element in an array:”

,

np

.

amax

(

inputArray

)

)

print

(

)

print

(

‘Minimum element in an array among axis 0(rows):’

)

print

(

np

.

amin

(

inputArray

,

0

)

)

print

(

‘Minimum element in an array among axis 1(columns):’

)

print

(

np

.

amin

(

inputArray

,

1

)

)

print

(

)

print

(

‘Maximum element in an array among axis 0(rows):’

)

print

(

np

.

amax

(

inputArray

,

0

)

)

print

(

)

print

(

‘Maximum element in an array among axis 1(columns):’

)

print

(

np

.

amax

(

inputArray

,

axis

=

1

)

)

print

(

)

Output

On executing, the above program will generate the following output −

Input Array is: [[ 2 6 3] [ 1 5 4] [ 8 12 9]] Minimum element in an array: 1 Maximum element in an array: 12 Minimum element in an array among axis 0(rows): [1 5 3] Minimum element in an array among axis 1(columns): [2 1 8] Maximum element in an array among axis 0(rows): [ 8 12 9] Maximum element in an array among axis 1(columns): [ 6 5 12] numpy.ptp() Example

The numpy.ptp() function returns the range (maximum-minimum) of values along an axis. The ptp() is an abbreviation for peak-to-peak.

inputArray

=

np

.

array

(

[

[

2

,

6

,

3

]

,

[

1

,

5

,

4

]

,

[

8

,

12

,

9

]

]

)

print

(

‘Input Array is:’

)

print

(

inputArray

)

print

(

)

print

(

‘The peak to peak(ptp) values of an array’

)

print

(

np

.

ptp

(

inputArray

)

)

print

(

)

print

(

‘Range (maximum-minimum) of values along axis 1(columns):’

)

print

(

np

.

ptp

(

inputArray

,

axis

=

1

)

)

print

(

)

print

(

‘Range (maximum-minimum) of values along axis 0(rows):’

)

print

(

np

.

ptp

(

inputArray

,

axis

=

0

)

)

Output

On executing, the above program will generate the following output −

Input Array is: [[ 2 6 3] [ 1 5 4] [ 8 12 9]] The peak to peak(ptp) values of an array 11 Range (maximum-minimum) of values along axis 1(columns): [4 4 4] Range (maximum-minimum) of values along axis 0(rows): [7 7 6] numpy.percentile()

Percentile (or a centile) is a measure used in statistics indicating the value below which a given percentage of observations in a group of observations fall.

It computes the nth percentile of data along the given axis.

Syntax numpy.percentile(a, q, axis) Parameters

a Input array

q The percentile to compute must be between 0-100

axis The axis along which the percentile is to be calculated

Example

inputArray

=

np

.

array

(

[

[

20

,

45

,

70

]

,

[

30

,

25

,

50

]

,

[

10

,

80

,

90

]

]

)

print

(

‘Input Array is:’

)

print

(

inputArray

)

print

(

)

print

(

‘Applying percentile() function to print 10th percentile:’

)

print

(

np

.

percentile

(

inputArray

,

10

)

)

print

(

)

print

(

’10th percentile of array along the axis 1(columns):’

)

print

(

np

.

percentile

(

inputArray

,

10

,

axis

=

1

)

)

print

(

)

print

(

’10th percentile of array along the axis 0(rows):’

)

print

(

np

.

percentile

(

inputArray

,

10

,

axis

=

0

)

)

Output

On executing, the above program will generate the following output −

Input Array is: [[20 45 70] [30 25 50] [10 80 90]] Applying percentile() function to print 10th percentile: 18.0 10th percentile of array along the axis 1(columns): [25. 26. 24.] 10th percentile of array along the axis 0(rows): [12. 29. 54.] numpy.median()

Median is defined as the value separating the higher half of a data sample from the lower half.

The numpy.median() function calculates the median of the multi-dimensional or one-dimensional arrays.

Example

inputArray

=

np

.

array

(

[

[

20

,

45

,

70

]

,

[

30

,

25

,

50

]

,

[

10

,

80

,

90

]

]

)

print

(

‘Input Array is:’

)

print

(

inputArray

)

print

(

)

print

(

‘Median of an array:’

)

print

(

np

.

median

(

inputArray

)

)

print

(

)

print

(

‘Median of array along the axis 0(rows):’

)

print

(

np

.

median

(

inputArray

,

axis

=

0

)

)

print

(

)

print

(

‘Median of array along the axis 1(columns):’

)

print

(

np

.

median

(

inputArray

,

axis

=

1

)

)

Output

On executing, the above program will generate the following output −

Input Array is: [[20 45 70] [30 25 50] [10 80 90]] Median of an array: 45.0 Median of array along the axis 0(rows): [20. 45. 70.] Median of array along the axis 1(columns): [45. 30. 80.] numpy.mean()

Arithmetic mean is the sum of elements along an axis divided by the number of elements.

The numpy.mean() function returns the arithmetic mean of elements in the array. If the axis is mentioned, it is calculated along it.

Example

inputArray

=

np

.

array

(

[

[

20

,

45

,

70

]

,

[

30

,

25

,

50

]

,

[

10

,

80

,

90

]

]

)

print

(

‘Input Array is:’

)

print

(

inputArray

)

print

(

)

print

(

‘Mean of an array:’

)

print

(

np

.

mean

(

inputArray

)

)

print

(

)

print

(

‘Mean of an array along the axis 0(rows):’

)

print

(

np

.

mean

(

inputArray

,

axis

=

0

)

)

print

(

)

print

(

‘Mean of an array along the axis 1(columns):’

)

print

(

np

.

mean

(

inputArray

,

axis

=

1

)

)

Output

On executing, the above program will generate the following output −

Input Array is: [[20 45 70] [30 25 50] [10 80 90]] Mean of an array: 46.666666666666664 Mean of an array along the axis 0(rows): [20. 50. 70.] Mean of an array along the axis 1(columns): [45. 35. 60.] numpy.average()

The numpy.average() function computes the weighted average along the axis of multidimensional arrays whose weights are specified in another array.

The function can have an axis parameter. If the axis is not specified, the array is flattened.

Example

inputArray

=

np

.

array

(

[

1

,

2

,

3

,

4

]

)

print

(

‘Input Array is:’

)

print

(

inputArray

)

print

(

)

print

(

‘Average of all elements in an array:’

)

print

(

np

.

average

(

inputArray

)

)

print

(

)

Output

On executing, the above program will generate the following output −

Input Array is: [1 2 3 4] Average of all elements in an array: 2.5 Standard Deviation & Variance Standard deviation

Standard deviation is the square root of the average of squared deviations from mean. The formula for standard deviation is as follows −

std = sqrt(mean(abs(x - x.mean())**2))

If the array is [1, 2, 3, 4], then its mean is 2.5. Hence the squared deviations are [2.25, 0.25, 0.25, 2.25] and the square root of its mean divided by 4, i.e., sqrt (5/4) is 1.1180339887498949.

Variance

Variance is the average of squared deviations, i.e., mean(abs(x – x.mean())**2). In other words, the standard deviation is the square root of variance.

Example

inputArray

=

[

1

,

2

,

3

,

4

]

print

(

“Input Array =”

,

inputArray

)

print

(

“Standard deviation of array = “

,

np

.

std

(

inputArray

)

)

print

(

“Variance of array = “

,

np

.

var

(

inputArray

)

)

Output

On executing, the above program will generate the following output −

Input Array = [1, 2, 3, 4] Standard deviation of array = 1.118033988749895 Variance of array = 1.25 Conclusion

By using examples, we studied some of the few statistical methods for a Numpy array in this article.

Easily Create A Screencast Of Your Linux Desktop Using Screenstudio

ScreenStudio

ScreenStudio is a JAVA-based screencasting application built around “avconv” that is currently available on all Linux distributions. It provides a simple UI along with a lot of configuration options. Once you launch the application, you’ll observe that all the settings are divided into various categories including Record, Stream, Overlay, Sources, and Options.

Installation

To install the software on Ubuntu (and other Debian-based systems), run the following commands:

sudo

add-apt-repository ppa:soylent-tv

/

screenstudio

sudo

apt-get update

sudo

apt-get install

screenstudio

For other distributions, head to the software’s official website.

Record

The application lets you record video in various formats like FLV, MP4, OGG, MPEGTS, and more. You can also select the Profile that suits you. As for the Preset, it’s ultra-fast by default, but the developers recommend using a “lower” setting if your computer can handle it.

Stream

Not only you can record a session to a file, you can also stream it to services like Twitch, YouTube Live, Hitbox, and more.

Just select the streaming service, configure the server, profile, Stream Key, and Preset information, and you’re good to go.

Overlay

The application also lets you customize your stream by adding overlays. For example, you can add a text overlay if you want your name, or your website’s name, to appear over the stream.

Here is what the default overlay looks like (observe the ScreenStudio logo and text at the bottom left) :

and here is how it looks after I made some overlay-related changes:

Sources

There are also some other options that let you choose things like which screen to record (in case there are multiple screens) and how many frames per second to record. This section also lets you choose a webcam and related settings like its stream size, delay, and audio settings.

Options

In this section, you can simply configure the recording and streaming shortkeys.

Other options

Apart from the settings explained earlier, the application also contains an “Options” drop-down menu that offers some generic settings. For example, you can set a capture area, window area, change the folder where video is stored, reset all your preferences, and more.

Conclusion

Himanshu Arora

Himanshu Arora is a freelance technical writer by profession but a software programmer and Linux researcher at heart. He covers software tutorials, reviews, tips/tricks, and more. Some of his articles have been featured on IBM developerworks, ComputerWorld, and in Linux Journal.

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How To Generate A New Sources List For Ubuntu

If you have ever peeked into the “sources.list” file located at the “/etc/apt/” folder, you will know that it contains the repository of all the packages available to your machine. Additionally, if you want to add PPA manually, you have to open this file and add the PPA to the end of the list. What if, on a fresh install of Ubuntu, you discover that your “sources.list” is empty? Or you need to change the whole repository to one that is specific to your country? How can you generate a new sources list without any technical skill?

The Ubuntu Sources List Generator is one great tool that you can use to generate source list for your Ubuntu.

1. Go to the Ubuntu Sources List Generator site.

2. Select the Country where you want to download the repository from.

3. Select your Ubuntu release.

4. Scroll down the list and select the components that you want in your repository. The standard ones are “Main”, “Restricted”, “Universe”, “Multiverse”, “Security” and “Updates”. You can also include “Partner” and “Extra” to include additional software that are not provided by Ubuntu.

5. In addition to the main sources, the Generator also include popular PPAs like Cairo Composite Manager, Cortina Wallpaper changer, GIMP, Google Chrome, Virtualbox, Steam, Spotify etc. that you can include in your sources list. Simply check the box beside the PPA.

6. Lastly, scroll all the way down to the bottom and press the “Generate List” button.

7. On the next page, you should see three big boxes. The first box at the top contains the sources list that you have selected and you will need to copy/paste them into your chúng tôi file. In your terminal,

gksu gedit

/

etc

/

apt

/

sources.list

Paste the sources lists into the document (for a new slate, you might want to erase all the existing sources listed in the file before pasting the new sources list in). Save and exit.

8. If you have added third party software’s PPA, it will show you the PPA key that you need to add to your system. Run the commands in your terminal, line by line.

9. The third box is the alternate layout for Synaptic, which you can ignore most of the time.

To complete the process, you need to update and upgrade your system:

sudo

apt-get update

&&

sudo

apt-get upgrade

That’s it.

Damien

Damien Oh started writing tech articles since 2007 and has over 10 years of experience in the tech industry. He is proficient in Windows, Linux, Mac, Android and iOS, and worked as a part time WordPress Developer. He is currently the owner and Editor-in-Chief of Make Tech Easier.

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