Trending December 2023 # Working Of Import Directory In Sass With Examples # Suggested January 2024 # Top 15 Popular

You are reading the article Working Of Import Directory In Sass With Examples updated in December 2023 on the website Minhminhbmm.com. We hope that the information we have shared is helpful to you. If you find the content interesting and meaningful, please share it with your friends and continue to follow and support us for the latest updates. Suggested January 2024 Working Of Import Directory In Sass With Examples

Introduction to SASS Import

SASS stands for Syntactically Awesome Style Sheet which is a css pre-processor that provides a feature to your stylesheet mark-up to make the writing styles in different ways.

Start Your Free Software Development Course

Web development, programming languages, Software testing & others

The @import is a directive in SASS pre-processor which is used to keep associated code in separate files. It allows us to continue code in one file as opposed to keeping the same code over numerous files. The @import directive can be used to import SCSS files in our main file, therefore essentially, we can combine multiple files together.

The .css will be the extension for a file

The url() can be a filename

The media queries can be used using @import directive

Syntax

The syntax for @import directive in SASS can be written as shown below:

Syntax:

@import mystyle.sass;

The above line includes the style sheet into another style sheet by using the @import directive. For instance, let’s take a file as chúng tôi with the below code:

Code:

a { color: blue; } body { font-size: 15px; background-color: red; }

Now, create another file with the name chúng tôi along with the below code:

Code:

@import "demo.scss"; p { color: green; font-weight: 200; }

When you compile the code, you will get the below code with the combination of above both files:

Code: demo2.css

a { color: blue; } body { font-size: 15px; background-color: red; } p { color: green; font-weight: 200; } Working of Import Directory in SASS

The import directive enables us to add several styles and can be broken into separate files to import them into one another. In this way, the SASS import directive works speedily to edit the style sheet.

Different plain CSS imports need the browser to make multiple HTTP requests as it displays your web page, and during the compilation time, Sass imports are handled entirely.

SASS works on the @import CSS. It does not involve an HTTP request. Instead, it usually takes the file we want to import and integrates it with the file you are importing into, so you can represent the web browser with a single CSS file.

Examples to Implement SASS Import Directory

Below are the examples:

Example #1

To run SASS files, you need to install Ruby for executing SASS programs.  Create a file with name sass_import.html with the below code:

Code: sass_import.html

Educba is online teaching providing server which helps various stream people or candidates to upgrade their knowledge respective to their domain.

Now create an scss file with name import_demo.scss and put the below code.

Code: import_demo.scss

html, body { margin: 0; padding: 0; } .styledemo { font-size:25px; background-color: green; }

Put the above both two files in the root folder of the installed ruby folder. Now open the command prompt and run the below command to watch the file and communicates it to SASS and updates the CSS file every time SASS file changes.

Code:

sass --watch import_demo.scss: import_demo.css

The above command will create a CSS file and called import_demo.css in the same folder where Ruby is installed. The import_demo.css file includes the below code.

Code:

html, body { margin: 0; padding: 0; } .styledemo { font-size: 25px; background-color: green; }

Output: Now, execute the html file and open in the browser and you will get the below result:

Example #2

In this example, we have used @import directive which imports the content of one file into another file. Let’s create a html file and save the below code as import_demo_example.html.

Code:

Now create a file called sass_import.scss with the below code:

Code:

ul{ margin: 0; padding: 1; } li{ color: #82BBDB; }

Code:

@import "sass_import"; .block { background: #26688D; } h2 { color: #B98D25; }

Explanation: In the above file, we are importing a sass-import file which adds its content into in this file when you made changes to the scss file. The @import could include the style sheet inside the other style sheets. The comprised files could either be placed on a similar server or added with a URL to a directory on the alternative server.

Now open the command prompt and run the below command to watch the file and communicates it to SASS and updates the CSS file every time SASS file changes.

Code:

sass –watch sass_import_demo.scss: sass_import_demo.css

Now, execute the file with the above command and it will create the sass_import_demo.css file with the below code:

Code: sass_import_demo.css

ul { margin: 0; padding: 1; } li { color: #82BBDB; } .block { background: #26688D; } h2 { color: #B98D25; }

Output: Now, execute the html file and open in the browser and you will get the below result.

Benefit of SASS Import

The main benefit of using the @import directive is, we can merge several files using @import and then compile the main file. Therefore, as a result, we will have only one CSS file and hence, the browser will not have to create more than one HTTP request to load up separate CSS files.

Conclusion

The @import Sass directive is one of the CSS rules which can help to maintain the code and break down the larger files into tiny files and also, facilitates import other files and ultimately one top-level file that will be compiled into CSS. If you are utilizing Sass pre-processor, you will create a good structure for your stylesheets. The structure without @import directive in Sass pre-processor is not possible to do properly.

Recommended Articles

This is a guide to SASS Import. Here we discuss syntax to SASS Import, working off and examples to implement with knowing its benefits. You can also go through our other related articles to learn more –

You're reading Working Of Import Directory In Sass With Examples

Working Of Mkdir In Python With Programming Examples

Introduction to Python mkdir

In this article, we will explore the Python mkdir function, which serves the purpose of creating new directories. The mkdir command is a feature available in various scripting languages such as PHP and Unix. However, in older versions like DOS and OS/2, the mkdir command has been replaced with md. In Python, we can utilize the mkdir method, which is provided by the OS module for seamless interaction with operating systems. To create directories in Python, we employ the os.mkdir() method, specifying the numeric mode and path as arguments.

Start Your Free Software Development Course

Web development, programming languages, Software testing & others

Working of mkdir in Python with Examples

Syntax of mkdir() function:

os.mkdir(path, mode =0o777, *, dir_fd = none)

Parameters:

The “path” parameter is used in the os.mkdir() function to specify the file system path for the directory to be created. It can be either a string or bytes object that represents a path-like object.

The “mode” parameter is optional and is represented as an integer value. It determines the file permissions for the newly created directory. If this parameter is not specified, it defaults to a value of 0o777.

The “*” symbol indicates that the following parameters are keyword-only parameters, meaning they can only be specified using their names.

The “dir_fd” parameter is also optional and represents a file descriptor referring to the directory. Its default value is None.

This function os.mkdir() returns nothing, which means it cannot return any value.

Example #1

Example of mkdir() function.

Code:

import os os.mkdir('sample') print('The directory is created.')

Output:

In the above program, we can see a simple code for creating a directory using mkdir() function of the OS module in Python.

Example #2

Now let us see in detail how to create a directory with specifying path and mode while creating the directory. We will also see how to cross-check the creation of directories in the command prompt. Let us see the below example of the creation of directories.

Code:

import os print("Python program to explain os.mkdir() method") print("n") print("The directory name is given as:") dir_name = "Educba" print(dir_name) print("n") print("The path to create directory specified is as follows:") pa_dir = "D:/" print("n") path = os.path.join(pa_dir, dir_name) print("n") print("The mode is also specified as follows:") mode = 0o666 print(mode) print("n") os.mkdir(path, mode) print("Directory has been '%s' created" %dir_name) print("n")

In the above program, we can see we are creating directories, one specifying the path and another directory specifying the mode. In the above screenshot of output, we can see both program and output of the program ad to confirm whether the directories are created; we can see it in the command prompt along with the date and time of creation.

Example #3

In Python, this mkdir() function, when used, might raise an error known as FileExistsError.

For the above program, if we try to execute it once again or if we are trying to create a directory that is already present in the drive, then it will give an error, and it can be shown as the below output.

Output:

Example #4

Now let us demonstrate how to declare or use the Python makedirs() method along with syntax and the example below.

Syntax:

makedirs(path [,mode])

path: This is used to specify the path to which the directory is created recursively.

mode: This parameter is given to the directories to specify the mode of file permissions.

This function also will not return any value as the function mkdir() also does not return any value.

Code:

import os print("Python program to explain os.mkdir() method") print("n") dir_name = "Article" print(dir_name) print("n") dir_path = "D:/" path = os.path.join(dir_path, dir_name) os.makedirs(path) print("Directory has been created using makedirs() '%s' created" %dir_name) print("n")

Output:

Conclusion

This article concludes that the mkdir() function uses the OS module to create directories in Python. The article also provides an example and syntax demonstrating the usage of this function. In this article, we also saw another function similar to mkdir() function for creating a recursive directory using makedirs().

Recommended Articles

This is a guide to Python mkdir. Here we discuss the introduction to Python mkdir and the working of mkdir with programming examples. You may also have a look at the following articles to learn more –

Working Of Python Uuid With Examples

Introduction to Python UUID

In this article, we will discuss Python UUID which is a Python module used for implementing or generating the universally unique identifiers and is also known as GUID globally unique identifiers. Python UUID module generates the identifiers randomly which have the value of 128 bit long and these identifiers are useful for documents or information in computer systems, apps, hosts, and many different situations that will use unique identifiers. This Python UUID module provides different immutable Objects and different versions of functions such as uuid1(), uuid3(), uuid4(), uuid5() which are used for generating UUID’s of versions 1, 3, 4, and 5.

Start Your Free Software Development Course

Working of Python UUID with Examples

In Python, there is a library or module which is inbuilt and is used for generating unique identifiers that are universal or global and this module is known as UUID, this module can also generate different versions of UUIDs and these modules are immutable which means their value cannot be altered once generated. UUID is mainly composed of 5 components with fixed lengths and each component is separated by a hyphen and uses read attributes to define the UUID string. This Python UUID is implemented based on RFC 4211 which includes different algorithms and information regarding the unique identifiers that are to be generated along with the required versions of UUIDs. In Python, this module provides various functions for different versions such as uuid1(), uuid3(), uuid4() and uuid5().

In Python, the UUID module provides various read-only attributes such as:

UUID.bytes which includes a 16-byte string.

UUID.fields which includes fields like time, clock_seq, node, etc.

UUID.hex can hold the 32-bit hexadecimal string.

UUID.int can hold 128-bit integer

UUID.Safe this attribute tells us the uuid version used is safe or not.

Examples of Python UUID

In the below section let us see a few examples of the use of function uuid1(), uuid3(), uuid4() and uuid5() using Python UUID module which is mainly used for generating UUID using MAC address. We will also see how the UUID looks like which means the structure of UUID.

Example #1

But we should note that when using uuid1() it might display network details such as the network address of the computer in UUID so it is not so safe to use uuid1() as it may arise privacy problems because it uses the systems MAC address. Let us see a simple example.

Code:

import uuid print("Progam to demonstrate uuid1() function:") print("n") uuid_version_1 = uuid.uuid1() print("UUID of version one is as follows", uuid_version_1)

Output:

In the above program, we can see the uuid1() function is used which generates the host id, the sequence number is displayed. We can compute these function values using the MAC address of the host and this can be done using the getnode() method of UUID module which will display the MAC value of a given system. Say for example

print(hex(uuid.getnode())) Example #2

Code:

import uuid print("Program to demonstrate uuid4() function:") print("n") unique_id = uuid.uuid4() print ("The unique id generated using uuid4() function : ") print (unique_id)

Output:

In the above program, we can see a unique id is generated using uuid4(). The uuid4() generates id using cryptographically secure random number generators hence there is less chance of collision.

Now we will see uuid3() and uuid5() where we saw a generation of UUID using random numbers now we will see how to generate UUIDs using names instead of random numbers using uuid3() and uuid5() which uses cryptographic hash values such as MD5 or SHA-1 to combine values with the names like hostnames, URLs, etc. In general, uuid3() and uuid5() versions are hashing namespace identifiers with a name, and few namespaces are defined by UUID module such as UUID.NAmESPACE_DNS, UUID.NAmESPACE_URL, etc. Now let us see an example below.

Example #3

Code:

import uuid print("Program to demonstrate uuid3() and uuid5() is as follows:") print("n") for hostname in hosts_sample: print("Hostname specified is as follows: ",hostname) print('tThe SHA-1 value of the given hostname:', uuid.uuid5(uuid.NAMESPACE_DNS, hostname)) print('tThe MD5 value of the given hostname :', uuid.uuid3(uuid.NAMESPACE_DNS, hostname)) print("n")

In the above program, we can see we are using uuid3() and uuid5() functions which generate UUID at different times but with the same namespace and same name. In the above program, we have two different hostnames and we are iterating using for loop. We can specify any number of hostnames and can iterate it using for loop.

As UUID is a unique universal identifier there are some privacy issues as we saw in the above section uuid1() compromises with privacy as it uses systems MAC address whereas uuid4() doesn’t compromise with privacy hence it uses a random number generator for generating UUIDs. Therefore we can say uuid1() is not safe to use and uuid4() is safer than uuid1(). Therefore to check if the UUID functions are safe in the latest Python version 3.7 an instance of UUID such as is_safe attribute is used to check for UUID is safe or not. UUIDs are used in various applications such as in web apps, database systems, etc. In Python, we can convert UUID to string and vice versa using str class and we can obtain string format removing the hyphen that is used for separation of components in UUID using string method replace() by replacing “-” with “” say for example

UUID_id = uuid.uuid1() str_uuid = str(UUID_id). replace("-", "")

And similarly, we can convert the string back to UUID using UUID instance such as follows:

uuid_id = uuid.UUID(string) Conclusion

In this article, we conclude that UUID is a unique universal identifier and is also known as a global identifier. In this article, we also saw the Python UUID module to generate the identifiers using a few uuid functions of different versions and we also saw different uuid() versions such as uuid1(), uuid3(), uuid4(), and uuid5() with examples and their privacy terms. In this, we also saw different read attributes, safety checks for uuid() function, and also saw the conversion of UUID to string and vice versa.

Recommended Articles

This is a guide to Python UUID. Here we also discuss the introduction and working of python uuid along with different examples and its code implementation. You may also have a look at the following articles to learn more –

Working Of The Push() Function In Perl With Examples

Introduction to Perl push

In Perl, the push() function is defined as a function to stack up on the elements or add elements to the existing set of items used in implementing the stack or array of elements for either adding or removing the elements using push and pop functions in Perl. In general, the push() function can be defined as an array or stack function for inserting or adding the set of items or values to another set or array of items where this push function is independent of the type of values passed in the set of elements which means the set of elements can have alphabets, numerical or both alpha-numeric values.

Start Your Free Software Development Course

Working of push() function in Perl with Examples

In this article, we will discuss the push() function provided by Perl for inserting or adding a set of elements to the existing stack or array of elements which is mainly used as a stack function along with the pop() function, which does the opposite of push() function which means the pop() removes or deletes the set or list of elements from the stack or array of elements. In Perl language, the push() function is defined as the insertion of items to the array or stack that is passed as an argument to this push() function, and also we need to pass another array to store these added items to the defined array and returns the array with added elements.

Now let us see the syntax and Parameters of the push() function in Perl:

Syntax:

push( arr_name, res_list)

Parameters:

arr_name: This parameter is used to specify the array name that is declared at the beginning of the code, which already has elements, and the elements are added to this array.

res_list: This parameter is used to specify the set or list of elements separated by a comma that needs to be added to the array defined, which is the first argument to the push() function.

This push() function returns again a set of elements as a new array having the elements of the previous array along with the added elements to this previous or defined array.

Examples of push() function in Perl

Now let us see a simple example of how to demonstrate the push() function in Perl:

Example 1 #!/usr/bin/perl print "Demonstration of push() function in Perl:"; print "n"; print "n"; @arr1 = ('Educba  ', 'Google  ', 'Opera  '); print "The first array is given as follows: "; print "n"; foreach $x (@arr1) { print "$x"; print "n"; } print "n"; @arr2 = (20, 40, 60); print "The second array is given as follows: "; print "n"; foreach $r (@arr2) { print "$r"; print "n"; } print "n"; print "After applying push() function to the given arrays"; print "n"; push(@arr1, 'Explorer  ', 'UC  '); push(@arr2, (80, 100  )); print "The new array after arr1 is applied with push() is as follows:"; print "n"; foreach $y (@arr1) { print "$y"; print "n"; } print "n"; print "The new array after arr2 is applied with push() is as follows:"; print "n"; foreach $s (@arr2) { print "$s"; print "n"; }

Output:

In the above program, we are declaring two different arrays one contains string type, and another contains numeric type values. In the above code, we first print all the elements in the array that is declared at the beginning, and then later, we call the push function. We pass the array such as arr1 and arr2, followed by the elements that need to be added to the previously declared array. Then we are printing the new array that has extra elements ( “Explorer” and “UC to arr1, “80” and “100” to arr2) along with the previous elements in both the arrays arr1 and arr2 now contains the elements that were pushed to the previously declared arrays using push() function such as arr1 and arr2 will now have 5 elements in them as arr1 = (‘Educba’, ‘Google’, ‘Opera’, ‘Explorer’, ‘UC’) and arr2 = (20, 40, 60, 80, 100). The output shows the new array, and the values are printed using the foreach loop.

In the above code, we should note that we have passed arguments to the push() function, but if we do not pass any arguments to the function, it will throw an error saying pass enough arguments to execute the push() function Perl. We can see in the below screenshot of the output of the above code that is modified where “push()” only called instead of any other arguments.

Example 2

Code:

#!/usr/bin/perl print "Demonstration of use of push() function in Perl:"; print "n"; print "n"; @arr1 = ('Educba  ', 'Google  ', 'Opera  '); print "The first array is given as follows: "; print "n"; foreach $x (@arr1) { print "$x"; print "n"; } print "n"; @arr2 = (20, 40, 60); print "The second array is given as follows: "; print "n"; foreach $r (@arr2) { print "$r"; print "n"; } print "n"; print "After applying push() function to the given arrays"; print "n"; push(@arr1, 'Explorer  ', 'UC  '); print "n"; print "After applying push() function directly"; print "n"; push @arr2, (50, 70); print "n"; print @arr2; print "n"; print "Applying push() function for joining or appending two arrays"; print "n"; push(@arr1,@arr2); print @arr1; print "n"; print "n"; print "Applying push() function for adding to array reference"; print "n"; my @arr = qw(Python Perl); my $arr_ref = @arr; push ( @{ $arr_ref }, qw(Java Ruby)); print "@{ $arr_ref }n"; exit 0;

Output:

In the above program, we can see we are using the push function directly to add the elements, and we also saw how to push() can be used for joining two arrays, and we also saw how we could add elements to the array reference. The output is as shown in the above screenshot.

Conclusion

In this article, we conclude that Perl’s push() function is used to push the elements to the array elements. In this article, we saw a simple example of how the push() function is used on different types of values. In this, we also saw various use of the push() function in appending of the arrays, and we also saw how to add elements to the array reference.

Recommended Articles

This is a guide to Perl push. Here we discuss the Working of the push() function in Perl with Examples and how the push() function is used on different types. You may also have a look at the following articles to learn more –

Working Of Cut() Function Pandas With Examples

Introduction to Pandas cut()

Web development, programming languages, Software testing & others

For example, let us say we have numbers from 1 to 10. Here, we categorize these values and differentiate them as 2 groups. These groups are termed as bins. Hence, we differentiate these set of values are bin 1 = 1 to 5 and bin 2 = 5 to 10. Now, once we have these two bins, we decide which values are greater and which are smaller. So, the numbers from 1 to 5 are smaller than the numbers from 5 to 10. Hence, these smaller numbers are termed as ‘Lows’ and the greater numbers are termed as ‘Highs’.

This method is called labelling the values using Pandas cut() function. Use cut once you have to be compelled to section and type information values into bins. This operate is additionally helpful for going from an eternal variable to a categorical variable. As an example, cut may convert ages to teams getting on supports binning into associate degree equal variety of bins, or a pre-specified array of bins.

Syntax of Pandas cut()

Given below is the syntax of Pandas cut():

Pandas.cut(x, duplicates='raise', include_lowest = false, precision = 3, retbins = false, labels = none, right = true, bins)

Parameters of above syntax:

‘x’ represents any one dimensional array which has to be put into bin.

duplicates represents the edges in the bin which are not unique values and thus returns a value error if not assigned as raise or drop.

include_lowest represents the values which have to be included as lowest values.

precision parameter is always represented as an integer values as it is the exact value which has to be displayed and stored by the bin numbers.

retbins are always represented as Boolean values and these are the parameters which help the user to choose which are the useful bins.

labels just helps to represent and categorize the bins as highs or lows. They can be Boolean or arrays.

right parameter checks if the bin is present in the rightmost edge or not and they are represented as Boolean values and assigned to either true or false.

bins just help to categorize the data and if it is an integer then the range for all values is defined as ‘a’ and this ‘a’ describes the minimum and maximum values. If the bin values are a series of scalar arrays then, the bins are not formed in a sequential format and finally the interval index defines whether the bins are overlapping or falling on one another or they are produced in a proper format in the output.

How cut() Function works in Pandas?

Given below shows how cut() function works in Pandas:

Example #1

Utilizing Pandas Cut() function to segment the numbers into bins.

Code:

import numpy as np import pandas as pd df_num1 = pd.DataFrame({'num': np.random.randint(1, 30, 20)}) print(df_num1) df_num1['num_bins'] = pd.cut(x=df_num1['num'], bins=[1, 5, 10, 15, 30]) print(df_num1) print(df_num1['num_bins'].unique())

In the above program, we see how to categorize the values into different bins. First we import numpy and pandas and then define the different integer values and finally add pandas.cut() function to categorize these values as bins and finally print them as a separate column and also print the unique values in the bins and thus the output is generated.

Example #2

Utilizing Pandas cut() function to label the bins.

import numpy as np import pandas as pd df_num1 = pd.DataFrame({'number': np.random.randint(1, 50, 30)}) print(df_num1) df_num1['numbers_labels'] = pd.cut(x=df_num1['number'], bins=[1, 25, 50], labels=['Lows', 'Highs'], right=False) print(df_num1) print(df_num1['numbers_labels'].unique())

Output:

Here, we do the same as previous but along with categorizing into bins, we also categorize these bins ad label them as highs and lows. We first import pandas and numpy packages in python. We later assign the values for the bins and by making use of pandas.cut() function, we differentiate the numerical values into bins and finally see which numbers are greater and which are smaller. So, the greater numbers are termed as highs and the smaller numbers are termed as lows.

Conclusion

Use cut after you rephased the sorted values into bins. This operation is additionally helpful for going from endless variable to a categorical variable. For instance, cut might convert ages to teams old-time ranges. Supports binning into Associate in Nursing equal variety of bins, or a pre-specified array of bins. The specific bins are solely go back only when the parameter retbins = true. Hence, for sequence bins which consist of scalar arrays, this will end up as the last array of the present bin. So, when duplicates=drop, the bins drop out the array which are non-unique and hence ends up offering adequate number of bins.

Recommended Articles

We hope that this EDUCBA information on “Pandas cut()” was beneficial to you. You can view EDUCBA’s recommended articles for more information.

Working And Examples Of React Render

Introduction to React Render

The following articles provide an outline for React Render. In React, Rendering is one of the most important processes used for making the browser to understand the components used. It is used to transform the react components in the Document Object Model (DOM) nodes which help the browser to understand and display the components on the screen. Elements manipulation is quite faster than manipulating DOM. React creates a Virtual DOM which looks the same as a DOM. Now, it allows us to make changes in the running application. React batches all of the changes made in the virtual DOM and compares it to the original DOM, and then it updates whatever has been changed.

Start Your Free Software Development Course

Web development, programming languages, Software testing & others

Syntax of React Render

ReactDOM.render()

ReactDOM.render(element, document.getElementById(‘root’));

Working of React Render

React elements are rendered into a DOM node by using ReactDOM.render. When we call for the first time to reactDOM.render(element, domnode). The contents of the DOM Node are replaced by the Element’s content. Now, if we call the render statement again, it updates the content of the DOM node by the new content from the element.

Examples of React Render

Different examples are mentioned below:

Example #1 – Basic Render in Timer

In the example below, we have used Render using a simple statement ReactDOM.render. The example below focuses on showing the time according to IST (Indian Standard Time).

chúng tôi

import React from "react"; import ReactDOM from "react-dom"; function tick() { const element = ( ); ReactDOM.render(element, document.getElementById("root")); } setInterval(tick, 1000);

Output:

Example #2 – Render used in List Rendering

In the example below, we have used render before return to import data from the database link in the chúng tôi file. And in chúng tôi we have imported render from react-dom.

chúng tôi

import React , { Component } from "react"; import axios from "axios"; export default class App extends Component { constructor() { super(); console.log("Constructor"); this.state = { title: "Heyoo! Welcome to Our Database", users: [] }; } callBeforeRender() { console.log( "Called after render 🙁 "); } async loadData() { console.log("Load data"); let { data } = await axios.get( ); this.setState({ users: data }); this.callBeforeRender(); } componentDidMount() { console.log("Did mount"); this.loadData(); }, 2000); } componentWillUpdate() { console.log("Will update"); }); } render() { console.log("Render"); return ( })} ); } }

chúng tôi

import React from "react"; import { render } from "react-dom"; import Main from "./App"; );

Output:

Example #3 – Counter using Render

In the example below, a simple counter with an increment of 1 is implemented, and in our chúng tôi file, render is used through ReactDOM.render.

import React from "react"; import ReactDOM from "react-dom"; function Logger(props) { console.log(`${props.label} rendered`); return null; } function Counter(props) { const [count, setCount] = React.useState(0); return ( {props.logger} ); } ReactDOM.render( document.getElementById("root") );

Output:

Example #4 – Auto Rendering in React

In the example below, render is imported through ‘react-dom’ and used to return the values. The timer automatically increases and tells the time spent by you on the page.

chúng tôi

import React , { Component } from 'react' import { render , createPortal } from 'react-dom' class Foo extends Component { componentDidMount () { this.props.shareState({ foo: 'You have spent time in seconds notified above' }) } render () { return ( Heyoo! {this.props.append} ({this.props.count}) ) } } const target = document.body.appendChild( document.createElement('div') ) const className = `.js-component-${name}` const targets = document.querySelectorAll(className) return [ ...reduced, target )) ] }, []) class App extends Component { constructor (props) { super(props) this.state = { theme: 'cyan', count: 0 } } componentDidMount () { count: count + 1 })) }, 1000) } render () { return ( <Components theme={this.state.theme} count={this.state.count} shareState={this.setState.bind(this)} sharedState={this.state} components={{ foo: Foo }} ) } }

Output:

Example #5 – Implementing 2 Patterns using Renders in React

In the example below, we have 2 props patterns, i.e Counter and List, and are combined in an application using Render through ReactDOM.render in chúng tôi file.

Counter.js and chúng tôi are the files used to implement the counter, and chúng tôi and chúng tôi are the files used to implement the list. Finally, the styling is taken care of using the chúng tôi file.

import React from "react"; import CounterWrapper from "./CounterWrapper"; return ( {({ increment , decrement )} ); }; export { Counter as default };

chúng tôi

import React from "react"; class CounterWrapper extends React.Component { state = { count: 0 }; const { count } = this.state; return this.setState({ count: count + 1 }); }; const { count } = this.state; return this.setState({ count: count - 1 }); }; render() { const { count } = this.state; return ( {this.props.children({ increment: this.increment, decrement: this.decrement, count: count })} ); } } export { CounterWrapper as default };

chúng tôi

import React from "react"; import ListWrapper from "./ListWrapper"; return ( {({ list , isLoading {isLoading ? ( ) : ( ))} )} )} ); }; export { List as default };

chúng tôi

import React from "react"; import axios from "axios"; class ListWrapper extends React.Component { state = { isLoading: true, error: null, list: [] }; fetchData() { axios .get(this.props.link) this.setState({ list: response.data, isLoading: false }); }) .catch( { error , isLoading: false } ) ); } componentDidMount() { this.setState({ isLoading: true }, this.fetchData); } render() { const { children } = this.props; const ui = typeof children === "function" ? children(this.state) : children; } } export { ListWrapper as default };

chúng tôi

import React from "react"; import ReactDOM from "react-dom"; import "./styles.css"; import Counter from "./Counter"; import List from "./List"; class App extends React.Component { render() { return ( ); } } const rootElement = document.getElementById("root");

chúng tôi

.App { font-family: 'Times New Roman' , Times , serif; text-align: center; }

Output:

Conclusion

Based on the above article, we have explained about React Render and its working. We have demonstrated multiple examples to understand how rendering can be used to transform the components into DOM nodes in different situations and requirements of the application.

Recommended Articles

This is a guide to React Render. Here we discuss the introduction, syntax, and working of React Render along with examples and code implementation. You may also have a look at the following articles to learn more –

Update the detailed information about Working Of Import Directory In Sass With Examples on the Minhminhbmm.com website. We hope the article's content will meet your needs, and we will regularly update the information to provide you with the fastest and most accurate information. Have a great day!