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Explore which high-growth cybersecurity stock is a better investment, Zscaler or CrowdStrike?

In the past, most cybersecurity companies installed on-site appliances to run their services. However, those appliances were expensive, took up a lot of space, and didn’t scale well with a growing business. Those shortcomings paved the way for a new breed of cloud-native cybersecurity services that didn’t require any on-site appliances. Two of the most well-known players in this disruptive niche are Zscaler and CrowdStrike. Let’s explore which high-growth cybersecurity stock is a better investment. Zscaler is a cloud-native cybersecurity company and one of the leading players in the zero-trust space. A zero-trust framework asserts that no user nor application should be trusted by default. The company has about 5,600 customers worldwide with an emphasis on larger organizations. In February, Zscaler reported a 63% year-over-year (YOY) rise in its second-quarter (Q2) 2023 revenue to US$255.6 million. This marks the highest growth rate in three years. The top-line growth was “driven by continued demand” for the company’s Zero Trust security platform. Its current cybersecurity stock price is US$204.76. Leading cybersecurity provider CrowdStrike Holdings has grown rapidly over the years thanks to the wide acceptance of its cloud-native Falcon platform. Through organic growth and strategic acquisitions, the company’s subscription customer base expanded to 16,325 in FY 2023 (ended January 31, 2023), a 65% YOY improvement. Earlier in March, CrowdStrike reported stellar Q4 FY 2023 results, with revenue growing 63% to US$431 million and annual recurring revenue up 65% to US$1.73 billion. Its current cybersecurity stock price is US$201.06. Zscaler and CrowdStrike have some cloud security capabilities in common, but otherwise, they exist to solve different problems. Integrating CrowdStrike with Zscaler is complimentary, as this allows Zscaler to control access while CrowdStrike detects and responds to threats across an organization’s IT estate.

In the past, most cybersecurity companies installed on-site appliances to run their services. However, those appliances were expensive, took up a lot of space, and didn’t scale well with a growing business. Those shortcomings paved the way for a new breed of cloud-native cybersecurity services that didn’t require any on-site appliances. Two of the most well-known players in this disruptive niche are Zscaler and CrowdStrike. Let’s explore which high-growth cybersecurity stock is a better investment. Zscaler is a cloud-native cybersecurity company and one of the leading players in the zero-trust space. A zero-trust framework asserts that no user nor application should be trusted by default. The company has about 5,600 customers worldwide with an emphasis on larger organizations. In February, Zscaler reported a 63% year-over-year (YOY) rise in its second-quarter (Q2) 2023 revenue to US$255.6 million. This marks the highest growth rate in three years. The top-line growth was “driven by continued demand” for the company’s Zero Trust security platform. Its current cybersecurity stock price is US$204.76. Leading cybersecurity provider CrowdStrike Holdings has grown rapidly over the years thanks to the wide acceptance of its cloud-native Falcon platform. Through organic growth and strategic acquisitions, the company’s subscription customer base expanded to 16,325 in FY 2023 (ended January 31, 2023), a 65% YOY improvement. Earlier in March, CrowdStrike reported stellar Q4 FY 2023 results, with revenue growing 63% to US$431 million and annual recurring revenue up 65% to US$1.73 billion. Its current cybersecurity stock price is US$201.06. Zscaler and CrowdStrike have some cloud security capabilities in common, but otherwise, they exist to solve different problems. Integrating CrowdStrike with Zscaler is complimentary, as this allows Zscaler to control access while CrowdStrike detects and responds to threats across an organization’s IT estate. Zscaler and CrowdStrike are leaders in their respective focus areas. They both have a respectable portfolio of big-name marquis customers, they both are well-covered for security and compliance, and they both offer a significant number of integrations with complementary technologies to enable them to be successful in most markets.

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Google Home Vs Amazon Echo: Which Is Better?

We’ll aim to answer all your questions and help you choose the right system for your home. If you’re buying only a single device, it doesn’t really matter too much, but most people decide that want more than one to cover the various areas of their home. Some people go as far as putting one in every room.

The bad news is that there’s no easy answer to which system is the best, so you’re going to have to read on to find out more before making up your mind.

Amazon vs Google: Smart home ranges compared

Amazon’s range is much larger than Google’s

Google’s smaller range can be easier to understand

Before we talk about the assistants built into these speakers and smart displays, it’s worth looking briefly at the ranges on offer from each company.

Amazon’s range of Echo devices is much broader than Google’s. It offers an Echo for every possible budget, from the wallet-friendly Echo Flex (£24.99 / $24.99) up to the Echo Show smart display with its 10in screen. That costs £219.99 / $229.99. There’s also a new version of the Echo Dot with built-in clock display.

There are now three Echo Show displays – 5.5-, 8- and 10in, five speakers (including the high-end Echo Studio) and you’ll find Alexa built into various other products including Amazon’s own Fire TV Cube, plus sound bars, TVs and third-party speakers.

Plus, Amazon sells accessory devices such as the Echo Wall Clock which can display countdown timers you’ve set with Alexa.

The Google Home range, some of which is now called Google Nest, isn’t quite as comprehensive, but this makes it simpler to understand.

It starts with the £49 / $49  Google Nest Mini and tops out with the Google Home Max at £299 / $299. There are two smart displays: the 8in Nest Hub and the new 10in Nest Hub Max for £219 / $229, matching the largest Echo Show.

As with Alexa, you’ll also find the Google Assistant hiding in other products including the Nest Cam IQ security camera and – naturally – Android phones.

Alexa vs Google Assistant

Assistant well integrated into Google universe

Assistant can hold a conversation and understand context

Alexa also competent but a stickler for correct phrasing

Regardless of whether you intend to buy a smart display or a smart speaker, both rely on their respective assistants to answer questions, set timers and generally get stuff done.

Which one is better is a perennial question, and arguably the most important and relevant question you can ask when choosing between Amazon’s or Google’s hardware.

Answering it isn’t straightforward though, and there’s no clear winner. Each assistant has its strengths and weaknesses.

Google Assistant leans heavily on Google’s search prowess, and is therefore fairly adept at answering any questions which could just as well be typed into a Google search box. It’s also fully integrated into the Googleverse, which means if you have an Android phone and use Google services such as Gmail and YouTube, you’ll really appreciate how everything works nicely together.

The Assistant is also much more forgiving when it comes to understanding what you say, so you can speak in natural language and it knows what you mean… most of the time.

Amazon’s Alexa is much more of a stickler for phrasing requests correctly, and will refuse to understand if you don’t ask in the right way. Unlike the Google Assistant, she won’t accept multiple requests in one go, and you can’t really have a conversation with Alexa as she doesn’t retain any information from a previous question.

Also, Alexa isn’t so hot on general knowledge and relies for the most part on Wikipedia. That means she tends  to struggle with the kind of local knowledge that Google is good at, but is very capable when it comes to telling you how tall the Arc de Triomphe is, or about the various species of lemurs.

However, Alexa is surprisingly knowledgeable about local retail and can answer “When does Tesco  close tonight in Sidcup”.

It’s easier and more natural to say Alexa than OK Google, but the latter phrase means the Assistant is far less likely to mishear and start listening by accident. Neither lets you set a custom wake word, but you can opt for Echo, Computer or Amazon instead of Alexa. Your only options in the other camp are OK Google or Hey Google.

Basics

Timers

Reminders

Weather forecasts

Message broadcasts

News

Sports scores

General questions

Both assistants have the basics nailed, including setting multiple timers and reminders, giving you a weather forecast or the latest sports scores.

They can also broadcast a message to all your smart speakers and displays in your home such as “Dinner’s ready”. Alexa and Google Assistant will also acknowledge you if you say thank you, which can encourage kids to remember their manners.

Google gains a point for responding to “Stop” when an alarm is sounding. With Alexa, you still have to yell “Alexa, stop”.

Impressively, Alexa can offer translations: this feature isn’t limited to the Google Assistant. You can ask either one how to say “Two beers please” in a different language.

Both Google and Amazon are constantly adding to their assistants’ capabilities. They can both identify who is speaking to them and offering personalised answers or content, such as what’s on your agenda today.

Amazon has given Alexa some useful new capabilities such as Guard mode where she will alert you if she hears breaking glass or other sounds in your home which you’d probably want to know about while you’re at work. However, many of these features are release in the US first and can take a long time to filter down into other regions.

Smart home

Both assistants are especially helpful if you have compatible smart home gadgets such as lights, plugs and switches. Using only your voice you can turn these things on and off and you can group them so they turn on and off together.

Both systems also allow you to group smart devices in a single room with a Google Home or Amazon Echo in that room. This allows you to say “Alexa, turn off lights” or “OK Google, turn off lights” and they will know which lights you mean.

Routines are another shared skill: you can set multiple things to happen when you issue a custom command. You might say “goodnight” and all the lights will turn off downstairs, the heating will switch off and your bedroom light will turn on.

Music

Alexa very capable for music playback

Google also good, but does not support Apple Music

Music is one of the main reasons people buy a smart speaker and, of course, both assistants are happy to play whatever music you ask for. Each company hopes you’ll subscribe to its own music streaming service (Google Play Music or Amazon Music) but you can also use other services such as Spotify if you subscribe to that instead. Amazon also supports Apple music now.

But opting for the ‘native’ service gives you the best experience. For example, if you have an Echo Show and use Amazon Music, you’ll see lyrics appear in sync for a lot of songs, but you lose that feature if you play Apple Music on an Echo Show.

Both Google and Amazon allow you to play music in sync on multiple devices, but this typically only works with own-brand hardware, with very few exceptions.

And while we’re on the subject, buying a third-party speaker with the Google Assistant or Alexa can often leave you locked out of certain features such as making calls to friends and family.

Recently Amazon removed the ability to play BBC Radio via the TuneIn service, so now you have to enable the BBC skill which, due to Amazon limitations, does not support alarms or multi-room. Google is unaffected by this change as it does not use TuneIn.

TV control

You can use Alexa or the Google Assistant to control what you see on your TV. You’ll need compatible hardware, though. For Alexa, that needs to be an Amazon Fire TV while for Google, you’ll need a Chromecast.

Skills

Developers can make ‘skills’ for Alexa

Google Home does not have a ‘skills’ store

One difference between the systems is Alexa Skills which are like apps that you ‘enable’ in the Alexa app. Some of these are just silly games like “Meow meow” which make Alexa meow at you when you make that sound. But many are actually useful, such as getting train times and public transport status updates, or are skills made specifically by hardware manufacturers so their kit is controllable via Alexa.

Google Assistant is also compatible with a wide range of hardware, but if it doesn’t just work straight away, there’s nothing you can do about it, and developers can’t create extra games and other skills.

Communication

Google Home lets you chat to any Google contacts

Amazon mostly limited to Echo users, but can also make phone calls

Amazon first added its Drop-In feature when it launched the first Echo Show. So long as you approve specific contacts (and they approve you) you can “drop in” on each other – i.e. make a video call – without waiting for the other party to answer.

Video calls obviously only apply if both parties have smart displays, but you can make voice calls as well. More recently Amazon added the ability to call phone numbers.

Messaging is built into Alexa as well and this can take the form of voice or text.

With the Google Assistant and Google Nest devices, you’re a bit more limited for video calls because the Nest Hub doesn’t have a camera. However, where you can make voice- and video calls you can talk to any of your Google contacts, not only those with Home or Nest Hub devices.

Smart speaker vs smart display

Smart displays allow for video and video calls

Smart speakers tend to sound better for music

Since both Amazon and Google offer smart displays and not only smart speakers, you might be wondering what extras you get with a display.

As you can probably guess, you’ll see information on screen when you ask a question, whether it’s a simple weather forecast or the instructions for a recipe (this is one of the most popular uses of an Echo Show according to Amazon).

Although the screens can show video, their small size means you’re unlikely to watch anything longer than the odd YouTube video or news briefing. And it’s awkward to use YouTube on an Echo Show: only the Google Nest Hubs officially support it.

Google also wins for photos, because you can display photos from your Google Photos account. Amazon can’t pull photos from Google Photos, so you’re stuck with the far inferior Amazon Photos service which, unlike Google Photos, doesn’t offer unlimited free storage.

The smaller Google Nest Hub, however, doesn’t have a camera so can’t be used for video calls, whereas all three Echo Show models have a camera. The two smaller ones even have a physical shutter to block off the camera and mute the microphones when you want some privacy.

Check out our roundups:

Verdict

If you’ve got this far, you’ll realise that it’s impossible to say one system is better than the other.

Ultimately, the right one for you will be the one that does what you want it to, and works with the smart home kit you already have.

You might prefer the strengths of the Google Assistant, while others might be happy to live with Alexa’s shortcomings in general knowledge and be swayed by the bigger choice of devices.

Just remember that you can’t really mix and match systems: you either go for Echos or you plump for Google’s devices. It’s far too confusing otherwise.

Once you’ve made your choice, check out the best Amazon Echo deals and the best smart home deals.

Nordvpn Vs. Avast Secureline Vpn: Which One Is Better?

A Virtual Private Network (VPN) offers effective protection from malware, ad tracking, hackers, spies, and censorship. But that privacy and security will cost you an ongoing subscription. There are quite a few options out there, each with varying costs, features, and interfaces.

Both Avast SecureLine and NorVPN are popular choices for many people, but which is actually better? Before making a decision about which one to go with, take the time to consider your options and weigh up which will best suit you in the long term.

Avast SecureLine VPN, from the well-known anti-malware company, doesn’t try to do more than it needs to. The service offers reasonable speed, privacy and security, and a few extra features. If you just need a VPN on your mobile device, Avast will be your cheapest option. Read our full Avast SecureLine VPN review here.

How They Compare

1. Privacy: NordVPN

A VPN can stop unwanted attention by making you anonymous. It trades your IP address for that of the server you connect to, and that can be anywhere in the world. You effectively hide your identity behind the network and become untraceable. At least in theory.

What’s the problem? Your activity isn’t hidden from your VPN provider. So you need to choose a company you can trust: a provider that cares as much about your privacy as you do.

NordVPN has excellent privacy and “no logs” policies. That means they don’t log the sites you visit at all and only log your connections enough to run their businesses (for example, making sure you’re not using more than the number of devices allowed by your plan). They keep as little personal information about you as possible and allow you to pay by Bitcoin so even your financial transactions won’t lead back to you.

Avast SecureLine VPN also doesn’t keep logs of the data you send and receive online, but they log more information about your connections than Nord do: when you connect and disconnect, and how much data you’ve sent and received, and keep the logs for 30 days. They also don’t allow you to pay by Bitcoin—BPAY, credit/debit card, and PayPal are the available options.

Winner: NordVPN has the best privacy practices in the business, though Avast offers enough privacy for most people.

2. Security: NordVPN

When you use a public wireless network, your connection is insecure. Anyone on the same network can use packet sniffing software to intercept and log the data sent between you and the router. They could also redirect you to fake sites where they can steal your passwords and accounts.

VPNs defend against this type of attack by creating a secure, encrypted tunnel between your computer and the VPN server. The hacker can still log your traffic, but because it’s strongly encrypted, it’s totally useless to them. Your security is enhanced but at the expense of performance, which we’ll look at later in the review.

For additional security, Nord offers Double VPN, where your traffic will pass through two servers, getting twice the encryption for double the security. But this comes at an even greater expense of performance.

If you unexpectedly become disconnected from your VPN, your traffic will no longer be encrypted and is vulnerable. To protect you from this happening, Nord provides a kill switch to block all internet traffic until your VPN is active again.

Avast SecureLine offers security through strong encryption but does not have the additional features that Nord does.

Winner: NordVPN. Either provider offers sufficient security for most users, but Nord’s kill switch and CyberSec malware blocker provide a welcome additional level of security, and Double VPN is worth considering when security is your highest priority.

3. Streaming Services: NordVPN

Netflix, BBC iPlayer and other streaming services use the geographic location of your IP address to decide which shows you can and can’t watch. Because a VPN can make it appear that you’re in a country you’re not, they now block VPNs as well. Or they try to.

In my experience, VPNs have wildly varying success in successfully accessing streaming services, and Nord is one of the best. When I tried nine different Nord servers around the world, each one connected to Netflix successfully. It’s the only service I tried that achieved a 100% success rate, though I can’t guarantee you’ll never encounter a failure.

On the other hand, Avast SecureLine was a disaster. I tried twelve servers in total, and only one worked—the worst result out of every VPN that I tried. Netflix somehow worked out that I was using a VPN most of the time, and blocked me. You may have more luck, but based on my experience, I expect you’ll have to work harder with Avast than NordVPN.

I had a similar experience when streaming from BBC iPlayer. Nord worked every time, while only one of the three Avast servers available was successful. Check our Best VPN for Netflix review for more details.

Winner: NordVPN.

4. Extra Features: NordVPN

I mentioned that NordVPN offers additional security features over Avast SecureLine, including Double VPN and CyberSec. When you dig deeper, this trend continues: Avast offers the basic features in an easy-to-use package, while Nord prioritizes additional functionality.

Nord offers a larger number of servers to connect to (over 5,000 in 60 countries) and includes a feature called SmartPlay, designed to give you effortless access to 400 streaming services. Perhaps that explains the service’s success in streaming from Netflix.

Winner: NordVPN.

5. User Interface: TIE

If you’re new to VPNs and want the simplest interface, Avast SecureLine may suit you. Its main interface is a simple on/off switch, and that’s hard to get wrong. When the switch is off, you’re unprotected.

When you turn it on, you’re protected. Easy.

By contrast, NordVPN is better suited to users with some familiarity with VPNs. The main interface is a map of where its servers are located around the world. That’s smart since the service’s abundance of servers is one of its key selling points, but it’s not as straightforward to use as its rival.

Winner: Avast SecureLine is the easier to use of the two applications, but achieves this in part by offering fewer features. If the extra features are valuable to you, you won’t find NordVPN much harder to use.

6. Performance: NordVPN

Both services are quite fast, but I give the edge to Nord. The fastest Nord server I encountered had a download bandwidth of 70.22 Mbps, only a little below my normal (unprotected) speed. But I found that server speeds did vary considerably, and the average speed was just 22.75 Mbps. So you may have to try a few servers before you find one you’re happy with.

Avast’s download speeds are a little faster than NordVPN on average (29.85 Mbps), and the fastest server I could find could download at 62.04 Mbps, which really isn’t much slower.

Winner: NordVPN. Both services have acceptable download speeds for most purposes. Nord had servers that were faster, and Avast SecureLine was a little faster on average. If speed is your priority, you’ll probably achieve better results with Nord, but you may have to try a few servers before you find a fast one.

7. Pricing & Value: NordVPN

Avast, on the other hand, charge a yearly subscription for a single device (and charge less if that’s a mobile device), or a discounted price for up to five devices:

One computer (Mac or PC) $59.99/year

One mobile device (Android or iOS) $19.99/year

Up to five devices $79.99/year

Which service is cheaper? Well, that depends. Avast offers the cheapest VPN subscription for mobile devices I’m aware of, just $20 a year. Or if you have a single computer and pay just one year at a time, Avast will still be cheaper.

But if you have multiple devices, or pay for multiple years at once, Nord will win every time. And if you’re committed to using a VPN, that’s exactly what you want: an inexpensive plan you don’t need to keep paying for that covers all of your devices.

Winner: NordVPN. Unless you only intend to use the VPN on a single mobile device, Nord will be significantly cheaper for most users.

Final Verdict

For those of you looking to use a VPN for the first time or prefer the easiest-to-use interface, you might want to consider Avast SecureLine. You’re probably not ready to make a multi-year commitment, and you can test the service on a single device quite inexpensively. In addition, you’ll become familiar with the basics of VPNs without the clutter of additional features, and Avast’s interface is about as easy as it gets. As long as you don’t watch Netflix.

If you’re still not sure which to choose, try them both. Avast offers a free trial version, and Nord stands behind their service with a 30-day money-back guarantee. Evaluate each app, run your own speed tests, and try connecting to the streaming services most important to you. See for yourself which one best meets your needs.

Hemingway Vs. Grammarly: Which One Is Better In 2023?

Before sending an important email or publishing a blog post, check for spelling and punctuation errors—but don’t stop there! Make sure your text is easy to read and impactful. What if that doesn’t come naturally? There’s an app for that.

Hemingway and Grammarly are two popular options out there. Which one is a better choice for you? This comparison review has you covered.

Grammarly is another popular program that helps you to write better. It starts with correcting your spelling and grammar (in fact, it was our pick in our Best Grammar Checker roundup), then identifies issues of clarity, engagement, and delivery. Read our detailed Grammarly review here.

Hemingway vs. Grammarly: Head-to-Head Comparison

1. Supported Platforms

You don’t want a proofreading tool that’s hard to access; it needs to run on the platforms where you do your writing. Which is available on more platforms—Hemingway or Grammarly?

Desktop: Tie. Both apps work on Mac and Windows.

Mobile: Grammarly. It offers keyboards for both iOS and Android, while Hemingway doesn’t offer mobile apps or keyboards.

Browser support: Grammarly. It offers browser extensions for Chrome, Safari, Firefox, and Edge. Hemingway doesn’t provide browser extensions, but its online app works in any browser.

Winner: Grammarly. It works with any mobile app and will check your spelling and grammar on any web page.

2. Integrations

The most convenient place to check the readability of your work is where you type it. Grammarly integrates well with Microsoft Office on Mac and Windows. It adds icons to the ribbon and suggestions in the right pane. Bonus: it also works in Google Docs.

Hemingway doesn’t integrate with any other apps. You need to type or paste your work into its online or desktop editor to check it.

Winner: Grammarly. It allows you to check your writing in Microsoft Word or Google Docs and works with most web pages, including online email clients.

3. Spelling & Grammar Check

Grammarly wins this category by default: Hemingway does not correct your spelling or grammar in any way. Grammarly does this very well, even with its free plan. I created a test document with a range of spelling, grammar, and punctuation errors, and it caught and corrected every one.

Winner: Grammarly. It accurately identifies and corrects most spelling and grammar errors, while this isn’t part of Hemingway’s functionality.

4. Plagiarism Check

Another feature Hemingway doesn’t offer is plagiarism checking. Grammarly’s Premium plan compares your writing with billions of web pages and publications to ensure there are no copyright infringements. In about half a minute, it found every quote contained in a 5,000-word test document I used to evaluate the feature. It also clearly identified and linked those quotes to the sources so I could cite them correctly.

Winner: Grammarly. It promptly warns you of potential copyright violations, while Hemingway doesn’t.

5. Basic Word Processing

When I first reviewed Grammarly, I was surprised to learn that some people use it as their word processor. While its features are minimal, users benefit from seeing corrections to their work while they type. Hemingway’s editor can be used like this as well.

It has all the features you need when writing for the web. I typed a bit of text into its online editor and was able to add basic formatting—just bold and italics—and use heading styles. Bulleted and numbered lists are supported, as well as adding hyperlinks to web pages.

Detailed document statistics are displayed in the left pane.

When using the free web app, you need to use copy and paste to get your text out of the editor. The $19.99 desktop apps (for Mac and Windows) allow you to export your documents to the web (in HTML or Markdown) or in TXT, PDF, or Word formats. You can also publish directly to WordPress or Medium.

Grammarly’s free app (online and desktop) is similar. It does basic formatting (this time bold, italics, and underline), as well as heading styles. It, too, does links, numbered lists, bulleted lists, and document statistics.

Grammarly’s editor allows you to set goals for your document. Those goals are used when it makes suggestions on how you can improve your writing, including the audience you’re writing to, formality level, domain (business, academic, casual, etc.), and the tone and intent you’re going for.

Grammarly’s import and export options are more robust. You can not only type or paste directly into the app but also import documents (as long as they’re no more than 100,000 characters in length). Word, chúng tôi text, and rich text formats are supported, and your documents can be exported to those same formats (except text documents, which will be exported in Word format).

Grammarly will store all of these documents online, something Hemingway can’t do. However, it can’t publish directly to your blog as Hemingway can.

Winner: Grammarly. It has better formatting, import and export options, and can store your documents in the cloud. However, it can’t publish directly to WordPress or Medium as Hemingway can.

6. Improve Clarity & Readability

Hemingway and Grammarly Premium will color-code sections of your text that have readability issues. Hemingway uses color highlights, while Grammarly uses underlines. Here are the codes used by each app:

Hemingway:

Adverbs (blue)

Uses of the passive voice (green)

Sentences that are hard to read (yellow)

Sentences that are very hard to read (red)

Grammarly:

Correctness (red)

Clarity (blue)

Engagement (green)

Delivery (purple)

To experience each approach, I loaded the same draft article into both apps. Both apps flagged sentences that were too wordy or complex. Here’s an example: “Touch typists report they adapt to the shallower travel as I did, and many appreciate the tactile feedback it offers and find they can type for hours on it.”

Hemingway highlights the sentence in red, indicating that it is “very hard to read,” but it doesn’t offer any suggestions on how it can be improved.

Grammarly also said the sentence was hard to read, considering that I’m writing for a general audience rather than academics or technical readers. It doesn’t offer alternate wording but does suggest I could remove unnecessary words or split it into two sentences.

Both also consider complex words or phrases. In another part of the document, Hemingway twice flagged the word “additional” as complex and suggested replacing or omitting it.

Grammarly doesn’t see a problem with that word, but suggested I could replace the phrase “on a daily basis” with a single word, “daily.” “A number of” was identified as being wordy by both apps.

The sentence starting with “If you listen to music while you type” was highlighted in red by Hemingway, while Grammarly didn’t see an issue with it. I’m not alone in feeling that Hemingway is often too sensitive about the difficulty of sentences.

Grammarly identifies one type of problem that Hemingway doesn’t: overused words. These include words that are overused in general so that they have lost their impact, and words that I have used repeatedly in the current document.

Grammarly suggested I replace “important” with “essential” and “normal” with “standard,” “regular,” or “typical.” This explanation was given: “The word important is often overused. Consider using a more specific synonym to improve the sharpness of your writing.” It also determined that I used the word “ratings” very frequently, and suggested I replace some of those instances with “score or “grade.”

Finally, both apps score readability. Hemingway uses the Automated Readability Index to decide which US grade level is required to understand your text. In the case of my document, a reader in Grade 7 should comprehend it.

Grammarly uses more detailed readability metrics. It reports the average lengths of words and sentences as well as the Flesch readability score. For my document, that score is 65. Grammarly concluded, “Your text is likely to be understood by a reader who has at least an 8th-grade education (age 13-14) and should be fairly easy for most adults to read.”

It also reports on word count and vocabulary, combining those results into an overall performance score.

Winner: Grammarly. It doesn’t just flag areas where the document can be improved but makes concrete suggestions. It checks a broader number of issues and offers a more helpful readability score.

8. Pricing & Value

Both apps offer terrific free plans, but they’re difficult to compare since they offer very different features. As I conclude below, they are complementary rather than competitive.

Hemingway’s online app is entirely free and provides the same readability checking features as their paid apps. The desktop apps (for Mac and Windows) cost $19.99 each. The core functionality is the same, but they allow you to work offline and export or publish your work.

Grammarly’s free plan allows you to check your spelling and grammar online and on desktop. What you pay for is clarity, engagement, and delivery checks, as well as checking for plagiarism. The Premium plan is quite pricey—$139.95/year—but you receive a lot more functionality and value than Hemingway offers.

Winner: Tie. Both offer free plans with different strengths. Grammarly Premium is expensive but offers significantly more value than Hemingway.

Final Verdict

A combination of Grammarly’s and Hemingway’s free products will give you more functionality than anything else if you’re looking for a free proofreading system.

Grammarly checks your spelling and grammar, while Hemingway highlights readability issues. Best of all, Grammarly is able to work within Hemingway’s online app so you can have it all in the same place.

Oppo Realme 1 Vs Xiaomi Redmi Y2: Which One Is Better Budget Smartphone?

With this pricing, the Realme 1 gives stiff competition to smartphones from already established brands in the budget segment like Xiaomi. To recall, Xiaomi has recently launched a selfie-focused smartphone Redmi Y2 in India that the company touted as ‘RealYou’.

Let’s find out between RealMe or RealYou, which one is the better budget smartphone!

Oppo Realme 1 Vs Xiaomi Redmi Y2 Specifications

Key Specifications Realme 1 Redmi Y2

Display 6.0-inch IPS LCD 18:9 ratio 5.99-inch IPS LCD 18:9 ratio

Screen Resolution FHD+ 1080 x 2160 pixels HD+ 720×1440 pixels

Operating System Android 8.1 Oreo with ColorOS 5.0 Android 8.1 Oreo with MIUI 9

 Processor Octa-core Octa-core

Chipset Mediatek MT6771 Helio P60 Snapdragon 625

GPU Mali-G72 MP3 Adreno 506

RAM 3GB/4GB/6GB 3GB/4GB

Internal Storage 32GB/64GB/128GB 32GB/64GB

Expandable Storage Yes, up to 256GB Yes, up to 256GB

Primary Camera 13 MP (f/2.2), PDAF, LED flash Dual: 12 MP + 5 MP (f/2.2, 1.25µm), PDAF, LED flash

Secondary Camera 8 MP (f/2.2) 16 MP with f/2.0, Selfie-light, Super Pixel and AI Beautify 4.0

Video Recording [email protected] [email protected]

Battery 3410 mAh 3080mAh

4G VoLTE Yes Yes

Dimensions 156.5 x 75.2 x 7.8 mm 160.7 x 77.3 x 8.1 mm

Weight 155g 180 g

Water Resistant No No

Sim Card Type Dual Nano-SIM with dedicated slot Dual Nano SIM with dedicated slot

Price

4GB/64GB- Rs. 10,990

4GB/64GB- Rs. 12,999

Design: Glass back vs Metal finish

If we talk about the design of the two smartphones, the Realme 1 stands out with its unique design. The phone has a diamond-cut pattern with a reflective glass-like back that provides it a premium look.

So, overall in terms of design, Realme1 is a winner here because of its diamond cut glass back body which gives it a premium look.

18:9 Display: FHD+ Vs HD+

While Xiaomi Redmi Y2 sports a similar 5.99-inch LCD display with an HD+ screen resolution (720 x 1440 pixels). Further, it also comes with 18:9 aspect ratio which means it has a full-screen display with minimum bezels.

Talking about the comparison, the display of Realme 1 seems to be sharper because of its FHD+ resolution.

Cameras: 8MP selfie Vs 16MP AI selfie

On the other hand, Redmi Y2 is a selfie-centric smartphone and has a 16MP front camera with f/2.0, LED flash and 2.0µm pixel size. It also comes with AI beautify 4.0 and offers portrait mode in the front camera.

Front Camera Samples

So, here we can see Realme 1 overexposes the selfie while Redmi Y2 takes little dull pictures while keeping the colors real. You cannot really decide which one is better at first, however, with more accurate coloring and better specs on paper Redmi Y2 wins here.

Single Rear Camera Vs Dual Rear Camera

Coming to the rear camera, the Realme comes with a single rear camera of 16MP. It has a f/2.2 aperture, PDAF and LED flash as features with depth effect, super vivid and HDR modes as well.

Rear Camera Samples

Here again, the dual camera setup on Redmi Y2 results in better pictures than the Realme 1. The single 13-megapixel rear camera on Realme 1, despite having depth effect cannot match the effect of the dual cameras.

Here are some other pictures to compare:

Hardware: Helio P60 Vs Snapdragon 625

The Realme 1 comes with a much more capable Helio P60 processor that also comes with AI capabilities thanks to a dedicated APU (AI processing unit). It is coupled with either 3GB, 4GB, or 6GB of RAM.

Helio P60 chipset inside Realme 1 is based on the power-efficient 12nm fabrication process.

So, in terms of hardware, the Realme 1 manages to push the Redmi Y2 over as the former packs a more powerful AI capable Helio P60 processor. Following are their benchmark scores:

Software: ColorOS Vs MIUI

Software-wise, both the phones come with the latest Android 8.1 Oreo. Realme 1 comes with ColorOS 5.0 on top while the Redmi Y2 runs MIUI 9.5 skin on top of Oreo.

Battery and Connectivity

The Realme 1 is powered by a massive 3,410 mAh battery with AI Battery Management which is enough to provide more than one day of usage. While Redmi Y2 is powered by a 3,080mAh battery which is said to offer full-day usage. So, in terms of battery Realme 1 is a winner.

When it comes to connectivity, both the phones support usual connectivity features. They both also come with dual Nano-SIM cards and a dedicated microSD slot support as well.

Conclusion

The RealMe 1 and Redmi Y2 both have been priced aggressively in India to lure the first time Android users while offering all the essential features. If we talk about the comparison, Realme 1 is a winner in terms of design, display, and hardware while Redmi Y2 has good results in terms of camera and also has a refreshed design. Overall, if you are not a fan of any of the company and looking for a phone with solid performance, Realme 1 is a good option.

Bitcoin Or Blockchain: Which Is A Better Choice For Business?

Blockchain and Bitcoin are distinctly apart, yet are very close to each other

Blockchain technology has gained huge momentum in the marketplace. For tech and IT businesses, integrating

blockchain

has become an essential part of automating business processes seamlessly. As more and more businesses are adopting this cutting-edge technology, enterprise leaders are renovating traditional business strategies to gain an edge in the competitive market and keep up with the rising customer demands. Accompanying this technology comes cryptocurrency. As it is needless to mention,

cryptocurrencies

are digital currencies that have revolutionized the very base of traditional finance and economy. The popularity of cryptocurrencies has experienced a substantial boost in recent times. With the emergence of this decentralized landscape, due to blockchain technology, major cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin have gained massive popularity among investors. But there are still several controversies revolving around this industry. One of the most prominent debates is about the differences and similarities between

Bitcoin

and blockchain. 

Several investors consider blockchain and Bitcoin to be the same things. But they are quite distinct in nature but are also somehow closely related. When Bitcoin was launched as an open-source code, blockchain was wrapped up together and was started being addressed as the same solution. But since Bitcoin is the first-ever project on the blockchain, individuals generally mix up both of these together, and that’s how the entire confusion started. Bitcoin and blockchain are being exponentially used in businesses for a variety of use cases, but both have very distinct functionalities which might prove helpful for respective business leaders, based on their individual enterprise requirements. So to understand which is better for business operations, let’s dive in and explore the basic differences between blockchain and Bitcoin to clear out any confusion.

The Difference between Blockchain and Bitcoin

First, let’s start by focusing on the contextual differences between the two. Blockchain is the distributed ledger technology that records transactions between two parties with better efficiency. Whereas, Bitcoin is the world’s first and the largest cryptocurrency. Presently, there are several other major cryptocurrencies in circulation that are competing with and against each other to dethrone Bitcoin as the best

cryptocurrency

in the market. 

Bitcoin transactions are stored and transferred using a distributed ledger on a peer-to-peer network that is open, public, and anonymous. And blockchain is that underpinning technology that maintains the Bitcoin transaction ledger. 

How is Blockchain revolutionizing traditional business processes? How Bitcoin can help businesses grow?

One of the many ways in which Bitcoin can help a business grow is by enabling automation and efficiency in transactions. With the presence of Bitcoin, businesses have the ability to complete transactions quickly and seamlessly. Crypto allows businesses to use algorithms that allow financial transactions to occur in real-time. The barrier breakthrough with

Bitcoin

now allows businesses to skip the complexity of traditional financial transactions on the internet as well as allow global access to various cash exchanges. Integrating cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin helps businesses to stand apart in the competition. With decentralization at hand, business leaders can complete transactions and funds without the obstacles of involving third parties.

What to use to successfully transform the business infrastructure?

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